LinkedIn – What It Is and Why College Students Should Care – Guest Blogger

College is a beginning. It is a time and place to begin to learn who you are, what you want and what is possible. College is also a place that the institution can teach you a lot, but what you learn yourself is even more important.

College taught me how to take tests about things I can’t for the life of me remember now in classes I couldn’t possibly see as relevant to my degree.

Yet what my college did not directly teach me, that I learned on my own, was balance. I had a full load, was on the dance team, participated in the theatre and worked a part time job. I had to learn how to balance all those things in eventually earning that degree.

It is also a place that, for many, will serve as the last step before entering the “real world” – after graduation getting that “real” job.

Although many universities and colleges have career centers to help you with that task – and they are wonderful, take them up on all the help offered, there is also something you need to learn in order to help yourself: marketing.

Before you graduate you need to begin to market yourself because once you are out in the ‘real world’ you are going to be thrust into sales. You are the product and the company. You have to learn to sell yourself to potential employers and pretty much anyone in a business sense that you meet in order to secure a position. That last part is called networking.

There are two important component to sales: the pitch and the means.

Pitch

Let me tell you a little secret: that degree is not the most important part of what you have to offer a potential company. It is a benefit of the larger product: you. You as a whole, your potential and what you bring to the table comprise the whole package of your product. That is what you need to learn to sell.

This is your pitch.

What makes you different that all the other graduates out there? You are not only competing with them, you are competing with people who have already been out there in the real world, so you are going to have to learn how to step up on pitching the goods.

What do you have to sell? Again, not just the degree – but how you got it. What activities were you in, how did you participate, what did you do, how did you interact with people and how did it benefit or provide value for the group? This is the basis of your pitch.

Working a part time job: learning to balance priorities, in the part time job it couldhave been customer service, problem solving, conflict resolution, team work – there is a host of skill that you learned.

Being an athlete: again, learning to balance priorities, team work, dedication, setting and achieving goals, serving as a leader – not just the performance, but what you brought to the practice and games.

Extracurricular activities: you guessed it – balance; working as a group, coming up with ideas or plans, implementing those plans, working on a team, accomplishing goal, speaking in front of groups, persuading, critical thinking, problem solving, conflict resolution – skills developed in the interactions and work done for the purpose of the group.

Means

Now that you have an idea of how to sell yourself for the whole package – skills, abilities, accomplishments and degree – where are you going to broadcast that message? One of the most important avenues of broadcast is LinkedIn.

Think of it as a business Facebook – without the pictures of parties, food or shenanigans. It is how people find out about you. When you meet someone and kinda-sorta might be interested in them, what do you do?

Most go to Instagram, Facebook, Twitter or other social medias to find out more about that person. Tada – instant snapshot of them and their life. What do they like, what are they like, those pictures and posts tell a story and it helps you make a decision if you want to try to get to know that person a bit more.

That is the same concept of LinkedIn but on a business level. LinkedIn is where you list your degree (or soon to be earned degree), interests and tell a story of who you are, what you have to offer and what you are looking for in a job.

Method to the Means

The summary section is most critical. This is where you get to tell your story. Crafting this will also help you on an interview because almost every interview you will ever have will start with some version of one statement: tell me about yourself.

With LinkedIn, this is not a formal interview, this is a conversation. A one-on-one conversation with the people you want to read your profile. Facebook is for everyone and their mother to read if you are public, LinkedIn as public is geared toward the people you want to read it – your audience.

Think of sitting in some foo-foo coffee house and the person you want to read it (a hiring manager from a specific industry firm) is sitting across from you and they say, “So, recent college graduate or soon to be, tell me about yourself?”

What do you say?

Not, “I will be earning my degree in XYZ in 20XX.” They know that. They are asking about YOU in an informal and business manner. What is the most important thing you want them to know about you?

What is going to get their attention? What will demonstrate you know how to balance priorities, can communicate well with a group, are coachable, dedicated to getting a job done? Is anything said above starting to ring a bell?

That’s right – bring in your entire college experience, but remember, bring in you. You could begin with something like, “I have always had a fascination with words. My grandmother was an avid reader and I learned by listening to her read and later reading Nero Wolfe, Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple. I loved how the words could create such great images in my head and get me hooked on the mysteries. I knew then that I wanted to learn to use words to create experiences for people. It is why I chose PR. “

Then you could talk about balancing all the things you did and what you learned from them.

Or you could begin with something more along the lines of “Growing up on a farm I am used to hard work.” Then bring that into the same hard work, dedication and working as a team that allowed you to be successful in class and on the field or court.

LinkedIn allows you more of a platform to create your brand. Why is this important – because this is where recruiters go to find you. According to an article in Kimberlee Morrison in Adweek (September, 2015):

92% of recruiters surveyed use social media as part of their process.
87% are using Linkedin
55% are using Facebook
47% are using Twitter

One last thing – the other social media. They will check that.

If I see a wonderful LinkedIn profile and meet with a candidate who tells me that they are very responsible I am going to verify. I will check your other social media posts. If I see whiny rants on Twitter about how hard school is or unfair the professors are giving you too much or party pictures on Facebook posted at 2 am on a Tuesday – that will not demonstrate responsibility.

Your social media is fair game in evaluating you as a candidate. Make sure the other places match up with what you are trying to sell.

Now, your homework is to get to it! Start crafting your sales pitch now, get out there on LinkedIn for them to find and start lining up the interviews before you graduate!

Please share your insight on this subject with us.

ABOUT THE GUEST BLOGGER

Lisa K McDonald-2017

Lisa K. McDonald is a Brand Strategist and founder of Career Polish, Inc., a national branding and career coaching firm. She leverages expertise as an Executive Resume Writer and Career Coach to help professionals free themselves from a boring corporate existence and into careers they truly desire. She is a frequently requested speaker and author with a passion for spreading her message to all professionals: you are not your title!

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30 thoughts on “LinkedIn – What It Is and Why College Students Should Care – Guest Blogger

  1. A prime piece of advice written by our guest blogger is, “Before you graduate you need to begin to market yourself because once you are out in the ‘real world’ you are going to be thrust into sales. You are the product and the company. You have to learn to sell yourself to potential employers and pretty much anyone in a business sense that you meet in order to secure a position.” Linkedin and Networking are like peanut butter and jelly: they go together amazingly well. The primary purpose of the site is to make networking faster, easier, and more efficient. With the site’s beautiful look, there are many ways to make your profile stand out. Matt Kapko (2015) writes, “You can also increase your exposure by adding rich media, a background photo and details about volunteer work, certifications or organizations you support.” Volunteer work, although sometimes overlooked, can be a rich asset for people in many fields. As a marketing major, my work for the Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma has shown my personal take in social responsibility.

    Kapko, M. (2015). 6 Linkedin Tips to make Your Profile Pop. Retrieved April 4, 2017, from http://www.cio.com/article/2868522/linkedin/6-linkedin-tips-to-make-your-profile-pop.html

    [WC – 196]

    • Mr. Rader,
      Most employers visit Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or other social medias to find out more about their potential candidate. The same goes to new hires when trying to understand the corporate culture they have an opportunity to be a part of. When applying for jobs right out of college, it is important to start looking and sending in applications 6 months before graduation. This helps you get a better grasp on what specifically meets personal preference and helps you better set goals. Having a variety of offers may make it more difficult to choose, but it will create a sense of security and less anxiety right after college. The frustration with starting out in an entry level position is that employers want experienced employees but everyone has to start somewhere. This whole dilemma becomes circulatory; you cannot get a job without having had prior experience. You have much to say regarding a well-maintained LinkedIn profile. Your advice is worth the read when You stated, “With the site’s beautiful look, there are many ways to make your profile stand out”.
      [WC-178]

    • Hello Connelly,
      Thanks for leading this discussion! Your status of “All-Star” on LinkedIn shows what good college students can achieve with the right mindset.
      You are building for your future!
      Dr. Green

  2. Social Media Band-Aid
    Regarding the job search specifically, there are pros and cons to either eliminating social media or having it. Since we are in an increasing digital age, there will always be technological advancements and demand for improved social media platforms. Akshata Shanbhag (2016) explains, “Staying up-to-date on LinkedIn, participating in Twitter chats, joining discussions in Facebook groups-these definitely open up more opportunities to get ahead in your career”. She then presents the misfortunate truth of social media skills having more impact on job opportunities than having technical skills in the field. Without social media it is hard to build your brand to an employer. Lisa K. McDonald discusses personal branding in detail; “Your social media is fair game in evaluating you as a candidate. Make sure the other places match up with what you are trying to sell”. Paying off student loans and the non-stop stream of bills adds enough anxiety to the transition process, coming out of college. Good jobs with benefits are even difficult to find. Going to career fairs and community events develops a strong network. The job search is tedious and time consuming. Having a social media account can hurt, if it is not properly maintained.

    Shanbhag, A. (2016). What Happens When You Quit Social Media? I Found Out. Retrieved April 4, 2017, from http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/what-happens-when-you-quit-social-media-i-found-out/

    McDonald, L.K. (2017). LinkedIn-What It Is and Why College Students Should Care-Guest Blogger. Nuleadership. Retrieved April 4, 2017, from https://nuleadership.com/2017/04/03/linkedin-what-it-is-and-why-college-students-should-care-guest-blogger/#more-1889

    [WC-199]

    • Hi Tina,
      Thanks for your well crafted post! There are trade-offs with social media platforms as you tell. You can gain great social networks for employment opportunities. However, you give up some of your privacy with exposure online.

      All,

      How do you make this trade-off for using social media or not?
      Dr. Green

    • Tina,
      You made a very good and interesting point in ‘having a social media account can hurt, if it is not properly maintained’. This thought expands beyond social media. It applies to your personal brand – your reputation – of which social media is a piece. Not all avenues of social media need to be used to their fullest, or at all, to maintain a positive personal brand. Maintaining various social media accounts can be exhausting and very time consuming. (Personally that is why I pick and choose which ones I use and to what degree.) Leverage the ones that you can devote time to and maintain in order not to become overwhelmed. Any transition cam be overwhelming, difficult or scary whether transitioning from college or a position one has been with for 20 years. The most important and impactful tool is attitude. With your astute observation (‘having a social media account can hurt, if it is not properly maintained’) I would challenge to turn it around to having a social media account can help you if properly maintained to see what a difference that can make.

    • Tina,
      You stated “regarding the job search specifically, there are pros and cons to either eliminating social media or having it. Since we are in an increasing digital age, there will always be technological advancements and demand for improved social media platforms.” You are so right, when we are young we use social media to express ourselves. However, sometimes we post inappropriate things or comments that at the time didn’t seem bad but could potentially cause you to lose a job later on. We need to be careful what we put out there, we should be trying to improve our image not destroy it. That’s why LinkedIn is such a useful site. Businesses are able to see a more professional side of you that some of the other social media sites might not show.
      [WC – 134]

    • Tina,
      I really enjoyed your post! I found a lot of comments that I agree with—especially when you said, “Going to career fairs and community events develops a strong network. The job search is tedious and time consuming.” I have had experience with searching for jobs, and it is not always an easy, fun time. In today’s day and age, going online to find jobs should be a given. Duffy (2015) gave some advice on job searching, and he said, “A few general sites that I recommend are LinkedIn, Indeed, Glass door, SimplyHired, and CareerBuilder. Depending on your field and location, social networking sites like Twitter and Facebook could easily make your list, too.” Getting your personal brand out there for employers to see is very important.

      Duffy, J. (2015). Make Your Job Search Easier. PC Magazine, 121.

      [WC-139]

  3. When reading Ms. McDonald’s (2017) post, this one statement really stuck out to me: “You as a whole, your potential, and what you bring to the table comprise the whole package of your product. That is what you need to learn to sell. This is your pitch.” No matter your GPA, how many social clubs you were involved with, or how much you learned in college, you as a person—who you present yourself to be to those around you—will outshine most everything else.

    So, how do you professionally show who you are? I think that LinkedIn is one of the best avenues for distinguishing yourself in today’s social media driven world. Paliszkiewicz and Madra-Sawicka (2016) wrote, “LinkedIn has initiated a new era of workforce recruitment in which recruiters, head-hunters, are screening candidates, and job seekers are encouraged to create professional identities—which will enable them to create positive impression on others.” Making positive impressions is important, so why not give LinkedIn a try if it could help you build your brand.

    Works Cited-
    Paliszkiewicz, J., & Mądra-Sawicka, M. (2016). Impression Management In Social Media: The Example Of LinkedIn. Management (18544223), 11(3), 203-212.

    [WC-195]

    • Jessica, you got it! ‘Who you present yourself to be’ – just make sure that comes from a value perspective rather than a duty roster of courses you took and activities in which you participated. Thank you for your comment.

    • Jess,

      You stated, “No matter your GPA, how many social clubs you were involved with, or how much you learned in college, you as a person—who you present yourself to be to those around you—will outshine most everything else.” This is a very important point. Your personal brand is critical when it comes to getting a job, which is why LinkedIn is a great avenue for this. On LinkedIn you can market yourself to employers. As stated by Paliskiewicz, “LinkedIn presents information about a user that viewers can use to make judgments about the source, such as their credibility, trustfulness, social and professional attractiveness.”

      PALISZKIEWICZ, J., & MĄDRA-SAWICKA, M. (2016). Impression Management in Social Media: The Example of LinkedIn. Management (18544223), 11(3), 203-212.

      [WC-125]

  4. One of the things that struck out to me by our guest blogger was, “College is a beginning. It is a time and place to begin to learn who you are, what you want and what is possible.” We all need to start somewhere and college is the best place for that. We find out who we are which is the stepping stones we need to market for ourselves. When going into an interview, our guest blogger suggests to, “bring in your entire college experience, but remember, bring in you.” It’s important to show businesses who you are so that you stand out among the crowd. That little bit of info might be the answer they were looking for and it might cause you to get the job. LinkedIn is a great way for businesses to learn more about you. It’s a more professional social media than Facebook or Twitter. Bernard Marr (2015) writes, “Ask for recommendations. Endorsements are great, but recommendations are the currency of the realm on LinkedIn. Reach out to past colleagues, managers, and associates and ask that they write you a recommendation.” Recommendations might be the make it or break it point.

    Marr, B. (2015). How To Create A Killer LinkedIn Profile That Will Get You Noticed. Retrieved April 5, 2017, from https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/how-create-killer-linkedin-profile-get-you-noticed-bernard-marr

    [WC – 196]

    • Sarah, well said. When you come through in your LinkedIn profile and it matches with the person you present during an interview it provides consistency in brand. This is important to recruiters and hiring professionals. There is nothing worse than reading a branding statement (LinkedIn, resume etc) that sounds like a dud then speaking to the person and they are a rock star (or visa versa). The first question they will have is ‘which one are you?’

  5. A statement made by Ms. McDonald that stood out to me was, “Let me tell you a little secret: that degree is not the most important part of what you have to offer a potential company. It is a benefit of the larger product: you.” This is a good reminder that we are more than what the piece of paper at the end of college says, and we need to learn how to convey that to potential employers. I did not realize that 87% of recruiters use LinkedIn when reviewing potential candidates. I also liked that Ms. McDonald pointed out that our other social media platforms are checked as well, so it is important to make sure we are projecting a positive self image everywhere. As stated by Paliszkiewicz (2016), “Managing self-presentation in online communities is an integral part of private and professional life.”

    PALISZKIEWICZ, J., & MĄDRA-SAWICKA, M. (2016). Impression Management in Social Media: The Example of LinkedIn. Management (18544223), 11(3), 203-212.

    [WC-164]

  6. Ms. McDonald helps establish her point in sharing her experiences as a college student. She states, “Before you graduate you need to begin to market yourself because once you are out in the ‘real world’ you are going to be thrust into sales.” Most students in college don’t fully grasp the importance of marketing themselves before they are set into the real world. The purpose for this site, LinkedIn, is to allow students to market themselves. It allows for students to network and make themselves known to potential employers. As it shows, 87% of employers use LinkedIn as a means to search for potential employees. A vast majority of students out of college struggle to find jobs, but with the help of LinkedIn and other professional sites, students may find it easier, and acquire job opportunities straight out of college.

    McDonald, L.K. (2017). LinkedIn-What It Is and Why College Students Should Care-Guest Blogger. Nuleadership. Retrieved April 4, 2017, from https://nuleadership.com/2017/04/03/linkedin-what-it-is-and-why-college-students-should-care-guest-blogger/#more-1889

    [WC – 140]

    • Josh, you stated “Most students in college don’t fully grasp the importance of marketing themselves before they are set into the real world.” and sadly this is true. Many of us don’t understand how to use this time wisely to help better ourselves in the future. Thankfully for us, we had the help from OBU to guide us in the right direction!

  7. As I am preparing to graduate in May, this topic is often on my mind. Did I prepare enough during my four years or even asking myself if I chose the right major. Simply stated in the post above, “Let me tell you a little secret: that degree is not the most important part of what you have to offer a potential company. It is a benefit of the larger product: you.” My major is not what makes me the perfect canidate rather than how I spent my time here. I chose to do my minor in marketing to better learn how to market any business that my career takes me to. Though now, I am realizing I am learning to not only do that but to market myself as well. Utilizing my online presence to market myself in a personable yet professional way.

    Nuleadership, /. (2017, April 03). LinkedIn – What It Is and Why College Students Should Care – Guest Blogger. Retrieved April 05, 2017, from https://nuleadership.com/2017/04/03/linkedin-what-it-is-and-why-college-students-should-care-guest-blogger/

    WC-167

    • Emily, congratulations on your upcoming graduation! You will do great on interviewing and branding now that you’ve got it that your college experience is more than your degree.

    • You stated: “My major is not what makes me the perfect candidate rather than how I spent my time here.” This is something I have had cross my mind many times the past two years. I think it’s something everyone here at OBU struggles with, even those who seem like they have it all together. Many times we can be discouraged by those who seem to be on the right path, but we have to actively choose to be all in for what we have chosen. In regards to making your Linkedin profile stand out, Larry Kim (2015) writes, “[The summary] is where you really sell yourself to potential connections. Your summary should expand on what appears in your headline, highlighting your specialties, career experience, noteworthy accolades, and thought leadership.” This section is where you really show why you’re passionate about what you’ve invested in! Show them why you are the passionate candidate they’re looking for.

      Kim, L. (2015). 22 Top Tips to Effectively Raise Your Profile on Linkedin. Retrieved April 7, 2017, from https://www.inc.com/larry-kim/22-top-tips-to-effectively-raise-your-profile-on-linkedin.html

      [WC – 178]

    • Hey Emily, I think your post, “Let me tell you a little secret: that degree is not the most important part of what you have to offer a potential company. It is the benefit of a larger product: you.” couldn’t have been worded any better, the company isn’t paying you for your degree necessarily, they are paying you, because they believe you are the man/woman for the job. So make sure you live up to those standards!

    • Emily, I will be graduating this May as well, you wrote “Did I prepare enough during my four years or even asking myself if I chose the right major.” During the long period of time that I have been constantly working forty hour weeks and being a full-time student, I have asked myself the same type of questions more than once. Having a degree from a good college does not give people a grantee that they will get their dream job right after they graduate, unless they know someone in that area, for which they are applying. It is good that you chose to take marketing as your minor because learning marketing skills can help you prepare for learning how to get the job that you want. One option that could help students who are finishing college would be to get an internship. According to a Forbes article written by Susan Adams, “Like establishing a LinkedIn profile and a blog, Schawbel believes it’s never too early to start interning.” This is something that I should have thought more about myself, however I have over twelve years in the retail world so I believe that I have gotten enough experience to be able to move higher up at my job, so that I can eventually get the job that I want. I believe that you will be able to do whatever it is that you have your heart set on just never stop learning or dreaming.
      [WC-244]
      Susan, A, (11, 12, 2012). 6 Things You Must Do To Get Your First Job After College. Forbes.com. Retrieved on 4/8/2017 from, https://www.forbes.com/sites/susanadams/2012/11/12/6-things-you-must-do-to-get-your-first-job-after-college/#711804887f74

    • Emily,
      This subject is a common thought for seniors in college. I too enjoyed Dr. Green’s statement, “Let me tell you a little secret: that degree is not the most important part of what you have to offer a potential company. It is a benefit of the larger product: you.” Utilizing online presence is important in marketing to stand out.
      [WC-60]
      https://nuleadership.com/2017/04/03/linkedin-what-it-is-and-why-college-students-should-care-guest-blogger/

    • Emily you stated that utilizing my online presence to market myself in a personable yet professional way” I totally agree with you on this because your online presence is your face in today’s marketing world it’s the first thing people search for, look up or check before they want or decide to meet you face to face. The power of an online presence is truly a remarkable way separate yourself from the competitor before you step foot in a room. They would already know who you are and what skills you bring to table and what type of person you are. Good luck to you in the future as well!

      Lavallee, D. (2015, January 16). The Traits of Athletes That Can Predict Workplace Success. Retrieved April 11, 2017, from https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/24185

  8. Responsible Social Media.
    Before we began are college career almost all of us have an idea of who we want to be. Then as we move through the motions of college we discover who we are, and in the end, we know just what we want to do. But the problem is knowing how to get the job that you are looking for. A good way to start this process is by beginning to market yourself, and you can do this with LinkedIn. Lisa McDonald brings ups a lot of good points one of which is this. McDonald, (2017), “If I see a wonderful LinkedIn profile and meet with a candidate who tells me that they are very responsible I am going to verify.” When someone does make their LinkedIn page it is important that they keep in mind that it is not good enough to have a perfect Linked in page but they also should make shore that their other social media pages are as respectable their Linked in page because just like Santa Claus employers will be checking out all potential employees twice. But it is not enough to show employers a sense of responsibility, but you also know how to be relaxed and are able to have a good time meeting new people. Carnegie, (1981), “You must have a good time meeting people if you expect them to have a good time meeting you.” When you are possibly meeting your next boss, it is always good to know that you are not the only one who could be nerves, so do not be who you think they want you to be. Respectfully be yourself and by doing that it will help create trust and likeability.

    [WC-286]

    McDonald, L.K. (2017). LinkedIn-What It Is and Why College Students Should Care-Guest Blogger. Nuleadership. Retrieved April 6, 2017, from https://nuleadership.com/2017/04/03/linkedin-what-it-is-and-why-college-students-should-care-guest-blogger/

    Carnegie, Dale. How to Win Friends & Influence People. Simon & Schuster, Inc. 1981

  9. Dr. Green,
    Your statement, “You are the product and the company. You have to learn to sell yourself to potential employers and pretty much anyone in a business sense that you meet in order to secure a position”, ensures the importance of networking after graduation. I am in complete agreement when you say that as college business students, we should care about networking and branding in order to achieve greatness. With technology being of such importance in our generation today, branding through social media is vital. As millennials, we should take note of your advice when you say, “They are asking about YOU in an informal and business manner.” When you brand yourself appropriately, it is good to brag about yourself. After all, hard work is valued and will be rewarded.

    [WC-131]
    Nuleadership, D. (2017, April 03). LinkedIn – What It Is and Why College Students Should Care – Guest Blogger. Retrieved April 09, 2017, from https://nuleadership.com/2017/04/03/linkedin-what-it-is-and-why-college-students-should-care-guest-blogger/

  10. Some great advice from our guest blogger Lisa K. McDonald mentioned that getting a degree is simply what gets your foot in the door. But it’s the skill set you offer and obtain that gets the other foot and your body through the door. Lisa K. McDonald mention “What do you have to sell? Again, not just the degree – but how you got it. What activities were you in, how did you participate, what did you do, how did you interact with people and how did it benefit or provide value for the group? This is the basis of your pitch. Being an athlete: again, learning to balance priorities, team work, dedication, setting and achieving goals, serving as a leader – not just the performance, but what you brought to the practice and games.” This spoke a lot to me as I am student athlete that is getting ready to graduate and enter the business world. With that being sad what do I obtain that can separate myself from others, the fact that I obtain leadership, communication, dedication, responsibility and most important my work ethic! These skills alone can eliminate my competition. “Successful athletes are accustomed to working through tough situations and know that energy is needed not just on game day, but in the countless hours leading up to it “Lavallee, D. (2015, January 16). Being a student athlete I not only handle school, but manage to create time for sports, work, social life, and more. The capability to be able to handle multiple responsibilities on a daily basics speaks volume. It simply shows that I have and can balance any problem situation in front of me. Like my uncle would always tell me “actions speak louder than words” and it’s a motto I still go by today.

    Lavallee, D. (2015, January 16). The Traits of Athletes That Can Predict Workplace Success. Retrieved April 11, 2017, from https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/24185

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