Growing Your Small Business With Fiverr.com: Tapping into the Gig Economy

Bringing in a New Year creates a sense of renewal and opportunities. Yet, many small businesses have a ‘wait and see’ attitude riddled by uncertainty and unpredictability of the future. Most organizations have limited resources and must be cautious about their business growth. If you own a small business, what could you do with an extra stack of cash in your pocket by reducing your expenses while improving the quality of your goods and services? Over the last few years, I have been researching the freelance market in order to assist small businesses with the resource deficiencies that most organizations face.

With uncertainty in the market and competition at a peak, most organizations should rethink their business strategies. December’s outlook was not entirely positive. The fourth-quarter marked the worst start for stocks in 10 years. Many experts are skeptical about the economy for several reasons including: failure of popular tech stocks and the fallout from the trade fight between the U.S. and China. There is a weakening global economy that is wreaking havoc to U.S. companies. According to the Commerce Department in December, U.S. factory outputs were showing signs of slowing down. All of these realities demonstrate that businesses are not safe by maintaining the status quo. Things are changing… like it or not. One of the glaring trends was a search globally for talent. While Fortune 500 Companies have the financial strength for this international initiative, most small businesses could not do this… until now.  In this discussion, we examine how today’s small businesses can leverage the power of the gig economy to secure great freelance talent to maximize their performance. Continue reading

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Are you ready to map out your life after

Are you ready to map out your life after retirement! Dr. Green offers a comprehensive workshop that explores how employees can enjoy a more effective life by planning out their life after retirement. Email advice@darylgreen.org to schedule your presentation or for more information.

Strategic Leaders for Disruptive Changes in 2019

Are you ready for changes in 2019?  If you are like most organizations, the answer is probably ‘no.’  Yet, today’s challenges require a different approach. In fact, businesses fight to survive in severe economic conditions. Shareholders replace CEOs like they change defective light bulbs. It is frequent and unpredictable.  In hopes of salvaging the latest struggling organization, executives usually implement quick solutions by cutting costs (which translates to mean people) and attempting to stop the hemorrhaging through technology. Yet, can today’s managers continue to do the same things and expect different results?  

Sadly, some managers foolishly rely solely on their experience to read market changes. Yet, the current market isn’t like the past! In many situations, managers are equipped to deal with the predictable.  Change that is either planned or incremental is addressed with a risk management approach. However, disruptive change is the hallmark of today’s markets. Disruptive change is sudden and unpredictable. Therefore, experience becomes a liability, not an asset. Organizations, using the old mode of operations, find themselves vulnerable. Established institutions fail. Unknown companies emerge to dominate new sectors. Clayton Christensen, author of Innovative Dilemma, attributes this phenomenon to disruptive innovation.  Therefore, survival depends on understanding the current markets and future trends.

 

Most organizations need strategic leaders to oversee disruptive changes. Strategic thinking represents a different solution for contemporary managers. Strategic thinking is more than careful planning of the organization’s work. Strategic thinking consists of two components, which are knowledge about the present and foresight about the future. Charles Handy, author of The Age of Unreason, argues “Discontinuous change requires discontinuous thinking. If the new way of doing things is going to be different from the old, not just an improvement on it, then we shall need to look at everything in a new way.”  Watt Wacker, Jim Taylor, and Howard Means, leadership gurus, suggest a visionary leader with the capacity of ‘living in the present’ while ‘living in the future.” Therefore, duality becomes a critical attribute of exemplary leaders in disruptive environments.

In summary, disruptive change is creating problems for most traditional organizations. Strategic leaders are needed.  Clearly, strategic thinking is different than routine planning of an organization. Unfortunately, some managers are unaware how this process can assist them in being competitive. Since contemporary organizations can no longer use outdated methods and cookie cutter solutions in this disruptive environment, managers must reexamine their operations. In fact, leaders must be flexible to sudden market changes. Therefore, effective organizations go beyond detailed planning to strategic thinking.

Please share your ideas on this topic.

 

Following Your Calling in 2019

Are you excited about coming to work? Do you enjoy your job? If you feel under-utilized in your organization, you are not alone. On a routine basis, many employees force themselves to work without a clear purpose. Numerous people work to maintain their daily bread without ever doing what they love. Sadly, many managers are unable to inspire today’s workforce toward greater performance. Manager guru, Peter Drucker, argued for several decades that managers must understand their employees as well as their customers. Few executives listened. Drucker concluded, “Business tends to drift from leadership to mediocrity. And the mediocre is three-quarters down the road to being marginal.” Yet, emerging leaders need to know how to rekindle such emotions in the workplace. In this session, we will discuss how one’s calling can transform an individual’s life in order to improve organizational performance.

Finding the right vocation in life is not easy.  In fact, becoming more productive in life is a function of working in a career that is aligned with one’s abilities. A great many folks are doing jobs that they hate and do not fit their personality. Gareth Jones and Jennifer George, authors of Contemporary Management, explain, “All people possess certain characteristics that influence how they think and their work.” Sadly, many organizations fail to understand this simple principle. Therefore, it is critical to know yourself and your personality. As a consequence, they have people in jobs that do not fit their abilities. Yes, the organization knows the individual’s education and career experience. However, managers are unable to understand the worker’s ability without input from that worker. There is a distinct difference between an occupation and a vocation. An occupation relates to the principal activity in an individual’s life that earns money for living.

Most people settle for an occupation rather than a vocation.  Some people, due to their own financial situation, are forced to work in jobs they hate. Others must occupy jobs where they are overqualified; this speaks to the issue of underemployment in our nation. Yet, many folks are slaves to their jobs simply because of the income. This situation can lead to stress, depression, and unhappiness. In fact, some people take desperate measures. According to one study, more than 30,000 Americans take their lives annually. In fact, this works out to more than three suicides for every two murders.

A vocation is a natural alignment with one’s ability. Vocation relates to a career which a person is particularly suited or qualified to perform. Some individuals credit this special alignment to a divine provocation. In the medieval Christian period, it was believed that God called certain people and their work was a “calling.” This calling was usually reserved for the clergy and the priest. In the secular sense, individuals who can fully use all their talents in a way that liberates them can make great contributions in society.

However, it does invoke a different mental journey. Marsha Sinetar, author of Do What You Love, The Money Will Follow, argues that individuals rarely take the time for introspection: “Most of us think about our jobs or our careers as a means to fulfill responsibilities to families and creditors, to gain more material comforts, and to achieve status and recognition. But we pay a high price for this kind of thinking.” This mental awakening is happening across the nation. Thus, some people are able to tap into their own calling.

Therefore, it is important that individuals take the time to learn what they enjoy and what they are good at. This reality will lead them to their special calling. In fact, one has a calling when he or she realizes what can be done with his or her God-given abilities.  Once this career revelation is realized, an individual can then take the journey toward greater happiness and job performance.

In closing, individuals who follow their vocation will be happier in the long-term.  In this session, we discussed how an individual’s vocation can transform a person’s life. As society pushes people to acquire more things in order to be happy, individuals can become unhappy with life. It is important that individuals take a personal assessment of their own career objectives in conjunction with their own calling. Let’s pray that it is not too late.

© 2019 by D.D. Green

About Dr. Daryl Green:

Dr. Daryl Green provides consulting, guidance, and management training for today’s business leaders. He is the Dickinson Chair at Oklahoma Baptist University. In 2016, he retired as a senior engineer and program manager with the Department of Energy after a successful career. Dr. Green has over 25 years of management experience and has been noted and quoted by USA Today, Ebony Magazine, and Associated Press. For more information, please visit http://www.drdarylgreen.com.

Building Emotional Intelligence in Today’s Leaders

In the movie Remember the Titans, the story follows the integration of two high schools. Herman Boone (Denzel Washington) is hired as head football coach in a very emotionally charged situation. At any point, something bad could erupt. Yet, the movie captures the attitude transformation of the team. The team captain, who was an All-American defensive player, finds himself complaining about the selfishness of another player.

Besides, this captain wasn’t supporting the head coach’s philosophy of becoming a successful team. Only when the leaders on the team supported the team strategy did the team start being successful.  Captains understand how to lead on their ships. In business, many managers do not know how to lead. Therefore, they are always lingering threats of a silent mutiny. How do managers stay engaged with their employees? In this discussion, we will examine how emotional intelligence can help today’s leaders better connect with their followers. Continue reading

Oklahoma Baptist University’s Researchers Reveal Vitalness of Instagram to Both Businesses and Consumers

Oklahoma Baptist University (OBU)  researchers in the Paul Dickinson College of Business ) reveals the importance of social media platforms, mainly Instagram for business growth and consumers.

Oklahoma Baptist University’s Paul Dickinson College of Business recently released research related to social media. This research evaluated the importance of social media platforms such as Instagram in the growth of business and consumers. There are several noted experts in the business college including Dr. Daryl D. Green and Professor Richard Martinez; both professors are established scholars. Dr. Green is an assistant professor while Dr. Martinez serves as the director of the OBU MBA program. The other authors who contributed in the research are Stephanie Dirlbeck, Lauran Evenson, Amalan Khadja, and Lisa MacManus;These individuals are current MBA students at the Oklahoma Baptist University.

In the research on Instagram conducted, the authors show how  to improve the survival rate of new social media platforms like Instagram. Additionally, the study also reveals the effectiveness of social media platforms as a powerful tool for business practitioners. With more than 400 million users on Instagram sharing 80 million posts on average per day, Instagram is here to stay. This research supported the staying power of social media. Given this perspective, social media platforms like Instagram are transforming how today’s professionals will conduct future business. Today’s academic institutions need to better prepare students for this new world.

Dr. Martinez concurs on the need to prepare today’s college students: “We are engaged in research projects that add value in at least two different ways. First, we want to better understand the emerging forces at work in the marketplace – forces that can’t be understood solely through the study of static textbooks. Second, we want our MBA students to understand the role – and value – of research and constant learning in creating opportunities in the midst of dynamic market forces. This project accomplishes both of those goals.,”

Dr. Green, who coordinated this study, argues for more relevant assignments for graduate students as well as undergraduates: “Our graduate students are taught about how to navigate change.  Understanding the digital economy is essential. Social media platforms like Instagram are leaving their marks on society. We want our students meeting the challenges of the future.”  OBU hopes to see more collaborating between faculty and students on critical topics in business.  Most faculty would see the benefit of teaming together with their students.

Stephanie Dirlbeck, OBU graduate students who led her group to complete this article, adds, “What I learned from completing this article is a number thing. The most important thing I learned and I’m sure my group members will agree, is time management. It took a great amount of research to write this article and I’m glad that we all made it a priority to conduct the research needed.  Along with time management, we discovered that social media is a huge outlet for companies to implement their marketing strategies. Marketing is evolving, and it was very interesting to learn about the social platforms we were studying: Instagram, Snapchat & Pinterest. The most difficult of conducting a case study is trying to make it sound like the voice of the article is one. Making the paper flow was a big challenge. Each member of this group had completely different writing styles. Dr. Green and Dr. Martinez did a really great job in guiding me throughout this entire process. As an MBA student, conducting research is still rather difficult but it made a difference to have Dr. Green guide us along the way.”

 

For more information about the research, visit:

https://www.arjonline.org/american-research-journal-of-business-and-management/table-of-content-2018

About Paul Dickinson College of Business

The Paul Dickinson College of Business is part of Oklahoma Baptist University. This qualified and Christian-based education is addressed for those who want to pursue a bachelor degree in business. The university provides the skills needed by the business graduates in contemporary professional careers as a leader. The business degree programs of the Oklahoma Baptist University are accredited and acknowledged by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs.

For more information on the Paul Dickinson College of Business at OBU, visit www.okbu.edu/business.

Media Contact

Dr. Daryl D. Green

Paul Dickinson College of Business

Phone: 405-585-4414

Oklahoma Baptist University

Email: Daryl.green@okbu.edu

500 W. University

Shawnee, OK 74804

Leading Small Churches in Social Media: 12 Actionable Steps to Engage Ministries

Pastor Phillip Myles is a big fish in a little pond. He is the senior pastor of Mt. New Hope Baptist Church in Colquitt, Tennessee with a population of 1,100. His membership totals 500 members. Having pastored the church for over 40 years, Pastor Myles

doesn’t’ see any reason to make any changes.His church is a prominent fixture in this town. However, membership continues to decline, and church attendance was at an all-time low. Some senior leaders blame the decline on poor self-motivation of members while others blame popular online church ministries,sitting at home comfortably. Pastor Myles states definitely that all this internet stuff was a fad. He isn’t going to change anything. Two years later, Mt. New Hope Baptist Church closes its doors. Pastor Myles wonders what could he have done differently.

How do leaders leverage the power of social media in their congregations? In Matthew 28:19-20, Jesus Christ provides a great mission to today’s churches: Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you…” The Great Commission has never been easy to carry-out in any way. Globalization and technology have changed the landscape of society. Yet, building relationships and connecting with individuals are more crucial than ever. Small churches that understand how to tap into social media and digital platforms will be able to become more effective. In this discussion, we will be examine today’s small churches as they exist in a digital economy.  Individuals will also learn 12 actionable steps for better engagement on social media and other digital platforms.

Today’s small churches face insurmountable challenges in a hectic society. Some pastors and church leaders are resistant to any chance of change while others do not have the knowledge or experience to embrace new technological ideas. Taking on more risks and failing can set back any organization. With small churches, the unintended consequences can spiral out of control.  Unlike bigger institutions, small churches have limited financial and human capital (i.e., people) resources to meet their daily needs. However, churches, in general, are struggling. The Barna Group, a private, non-partisan organization, has been researching cultural trends related to values, beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors since 1984. They note that Americans are attending church less while more people are practicing their faith outside of traditional institutions like churches.

Younger generations, like Millennials, are skeptic and cynical toward institutions. In fact, the number of unchurched youth continue to rise. According to the Barna Group, most people (73%) in the United States identify themselves as Christian. Corporate worship is essential for most church members. Surprisingly, the largest group of American churchgoers (46%) attends services in congregations of 100 or fewer members; more than one-third (37%) attend a medium church of over 100, but less than 500 members. With that said, small churches provide a good medium for building immediate relationships.

What is social media? We live in a world where everyone is connected. We network with each other at work, at home, and at play. Networking is about building relationships. In the digital platform, these relationships can be expanded electronically in the form of social networks. Below are some online statistics to consider about social media:

  • There are 3.03 billion active social media users (total worldwide population is 7.6 billion).
  • 81% of all small and medium businesses use the social platform.
  • 96% of Americans with internet access have made an online purchase in their life, 80% in the past month alone.
  • On average, people have 5.54 social media accounts.
  • The average daily time spent on social media is 116 minutes a day.

As you can tell, U.S. citizens have already made social media an important part of their lives. This reality will not change soon. In general, social media falls under the category of digital marketing.  Digital marketing encompasses all marketing efforts that utilize the internet or digital devices; it includes websites, blogs, emails, online advertising, social media, and other electronic services. In the business world, businesses employ digital marketing to become more profitable chiefly through selling products/services, advertising, or gaining business leads. Then, social media involves sharing and discussing information about individuals using social platforms like Facebook and YouTube.com. Most small churches need to think strategically about how to apply social media to their ministries and not a shot-gun approach.  

This planning requires thinking about future digital trends like artificial intelligence. For example, by 2020, customers will manage 85% of their purchases without interacting with a person.  Knowing relevant trends can better position an organization. Generally, most churches will take advantage of social media for the following purposes: (a) Communicating to existing church members, (b) Reaching out to prospective members, and (c) Sharing information to others (i.e., Great Commission). Like small businesses that have limited resources, today’s small churches can adopt digital tactics to expand their Great Commission. Below are some immediate steps to consider:

  • Have an online presence to reach the target audience.
  • Identify a point of contact (POC) for social media.
  • Provide training in social media for POC.
  • Establish goals for the church as it relates to social media.
  • Identify your target audience and gather feedback on them.
  • Perform a digital/social media audit (i.e., evaluation) of your church.
  • Develop a written strategy for your church.
  • Define desired outcomes for tracking (i.e., visitors to website, views).
  • Select social media platforms that fit within your goals.
  • Create appealing website content.
  • Track and monitor results.
  • Get help for outside experts, if needed.

Today’s organizations are facing tremendous changes in society.  Today’s small churches are no exceptions. With limited resources and knowledge about emerging technologies, figuring out how to best apply social media platforms is not an easy endeavor. Church leaders who are willing to embrace the advantages of social media are in a better position to carry out the Great Commission in the fullest sense. As you can see, I demonstrated how today’s small churches can leverage social media and digital platforms to become more effective. In reality, the effort may require more out-of-the-box thinking and additional energy to implement. However, the rewards are worth the time of the small church. Let’s pray that it is not too late.

Please share your ideas on this topic.
© 2018 by D.D. Green

Inspiring Generation Z with Transformational Leadership

I was stuck right in the middle. I brought a group of GEN Y and GEN Z college students on a service trip involving our faith. The coordinator for our service project was a good man with great intentions for the team. However, he managed the group as an authoritarian leader with a  militaristic top-down approach. Feedback and input were not necessarily desired. While I was accustomed to this style and could adjust, this leadership style did not resonate well with the young members of the group.

He conveyed to me that the students complained too much about the circumstances while the younger members complained about the leader not listening or caring about them. The relationship could have gone south. I provided each group a different perspective about each other. The leader attempted to make changes, including asking for my input from the group and the young members responded by acknowledging his attempt to build bridges. From that point, the group was able to achieve more and have a better relationship within the group. The situation reaffirmed to me the importance of understanding generational issues and how to inspire younger generations toward great performance.

In today’s organizations, they face an arsenal of disruptive change and chaos all around us.

Disruptive change speaks the changing nature of our society. In fact, our extensive experience about the past can haunt us in a world riddled with uncertainty. Having young employees who are technologically savvy and adaptable to these environmental climates could help an organization succeed. Yet, many executives do not know how to recruit, retain, or to inspire these young generations.    

As a result, organizations that wish to compete today must understand how to inspire Generation Z employees for sustainable success. However, this task is not easy. When Generation Y (aka Millennials) entered the workplace for the first time, some managers were given bad advice. The advice included telling managers to praise Millennials regardless of their performance, reward them for just showing up to work, put hand-held devices in the hands (and get out their way), and allow them come to work whenever they want to (allow them to bring their puppies). In this scenario, the workplace becomes a magical place where every workday is filled with fun and excitement.

That advisement was misleading and created unrealistic expectations of the workplace and resentment from older generations. What organization can afford to get Generation Z wrong under this global landscape?  Thus, understanding generational issues can assist managers with a multi-generation workforce and lead them toward greater performance as a team. In this discussion, I will examine how today’s organization can inspire Generation Z employees with transformational leadership.

Today’s businesses cannot afford to overlook Generation Z. For the first time in history, five generations are co-existing together in the workplace. Each generation has distinct attributes, such as belief systems, expectations, and behaviors. Managing Generation Z will not be easy. Generation Z is the most global, diverse, technological, and entrepreneurial generation ever. In fact, they have never known a digital world without smartphones and social media. In general, they were born in 1995 and after. This generation makes up about 26% of the U.S. population. Each generation is shaped by parenting and its social environment. Managers should not merely lump Generation Y and Generation Z in the same category. Some experts note that Generation Z is more focused than Generation Y or Millennials.

Forbes contributor Deep Patel in his article “8 Ways Generation Z Will Differ From Millennials In The Workplace” notes that Generation Z are more independent thinkers than Generation Y. He adds, “While millennials are often seen as more idealistic, and more motivated by purpose than a paycheck, Generation Z may lean more toward security and money. This is a pragmatic generation — they care about making a difference, but are ultimately motivated by ensuring they have a secure life outside of work. If you’re looking to recruit members of Generation Z, you may be able to tempt them with promises of job security and raises down the line.” Given the unique characteristics of Generation Z, employers cannot afford to use the same old recruitment and retention strategies on this younger generation.

Dr. Green reads to Generation Z students at Revelation Ministries in Cape Town, South Africa.

In this unstable environment, organizations need the right type of leadership for Generation Z employees. These younger employees will tend to respond better with transformational leadership than a transactional leadership style. In a nutshell, all managers are not leaders. Some managers are great at defining tasks and having the employees work toward that goal. They rule by their position in the organization. Otherwise, no one would follow them. In fact, these same managers are lousy at inspiring their employees. In transactional leadership, individuals lead others in an ‘exchange’ of work for rewards/punishment. If employees completed the assigned work scope, they would be compensated with wages, full employment, or other benefits; likewise, if they do not perform, they could be punished or fired.

Dr. Green attempted to connect with Generation Z students at Revelation Ministries in Cape Town, South Africa.

Whereas transactional leadership rarely produce zealots who are inspired in organizations, transformational leadership has the ability of getting the greater buy-in of followers. In the simplest sense, transformational leadership can be defined ‘as a leadership approach that causes a change in individuals and social systems…it creates valuable and positive change in the followers with the end goal of developing followers into leaders.” Generation Z employees need leaders who can connect with them and inspire them toward greater achievements. Generation Z are realistic and concerned about their safety and the world. Some would call them anxious. According to one study, 58% of Gen Z’s are either somewhat or very worried about the future. Below are some interesting statistics on Generation Z:

  • 66% say that technology makes them feel that anything is possible.
  • 76% feel that their online experiences will help them reach their goals.
  • 79% display symptoms of emotional distress when kept away from their personal electronic devices.
  • 72% of Gen Z want to start a business someday.
  • 30% feel their college has failed at teaching them applicable real-life business skills.

Leadership guru Dr. Richard Daft argues that transactional leadership may not be enough in a disruptive, changing world: “Transactional skills are important for all leaders. However, in a world in which success often depends on continuous change, organizations also need transformational leadership…Transformational leadership is based on the personal values, beliefs, and qualities of the leader rather than on an exchange process between leaders and followers. Given the generational characteristics of Generation Z and the need for success in organizations, the following suggestions are offered to lead this generation:

  • Create a shared vision within the organization.
  • Get to know employees, especially newer ones in the organization.
  • Define goals, objectives, and desired objectives, making boundaries clear.
  • Ask for feedback when appropriate and follow-up on the endpoint.
  • Show how each person is valued within the organization.
  • Seek to inspire employees by tapping into their intrinsic rewards.
  • Build teamwork in the organization with group incentives (i.e., bonuses).

With continual pressures to compete, today’s businesses need to have employees who are adaptable to disruptive changes. In our society, there are 5 generations that co-exist in the workplace. Perhaps, Generation Z with its diversity and ingenuity may be the best of all generations. Yet, managers who do not understand Generation Z employees may not be able to get the most out of them. In our discussion today, I outlined how today’s organization can inspire Generation Z employees with transformational leadership.  Unlike transactional leaders, transformational leaders must tap into their followers to find what motives them. Working with Generation Z employees will pose the same type of challenges. With change continuing to be more rapid and unpredictable, today’s organizations cannot hope to succeed without getting the best out of each employee. We pray that it is not too late to inspire Generation Z in your own organizations.

Please share your insight on this topic.

© 2018 by D. D. Green

About Dr. Daryl Green:
Dr. Daryl Green provides consulting, guidance, and management training for today’s business leaders. He is the Dickinson Chair at Oklahoma Baptist University. In 2016, he retired as a senior engineer and program manager with the Department of Energy after a successful career. Dr. Green has over 25 years of management experience and has been noted and quoted by USA Today, Ebony Magazine, and Associated Press. For more information, please visit http://www.drdarylgreen.com.

Retooling Ethical Behavior With Agrarian Leadership

Summary: Examine the concept of agrarian leadership in today’s society. Dr. Green shares how to infuse ethical behavior in the workplace with a different type of leadership. 

We live in a digital economy. Technology and innovation continue to improve our wants and desires. Like the Great Roman Empire, the moral decay in our society will slowly eat us from the inside out. In order to improve leaders’ value systems, we need to regain the values of agrarian society. Leadership expert Vana Prewitt argues that the current leadership theories are based on modernist assumptions and are out of date with leading today’s postmodern organizations. Given this dilemma, I advocate for a different kind of 21st leadership.

Today’s leaders need a fresh and authentic outlook, which is morally sound. In fact, a leader’s vision must be deeply rooted. Ian Palmer, Richard Dunford, and David Buchanan, authors of Managing Organizational Change explain, “Visions are thus linked to strategy and competitive advantage, enhancing organizational performance and sustaining growth… A lack of vision, on the other hand, is associated with organizational decline and failure.” Let’s look at Agrarian leadership. Agrarian leadership is defined as a contextual influence that has an impact on subordinates’ attitudes and performance by leaders who are both value and results driven. Agrarian leaders view their followers as critical parts of the socio-technical system. Therefore, technology does not drive the value system of society.

Before the Industrial Revolution, life was centered on land and labor. Life was simple for the leader in the agrarian society. Rural living revolved around the land; owning it was equivalent to self-sufficiency and liberty. Although Americans lived in a tribal structure prior to the Agrarian Era (1650-1849), farming communities operated in a decentralized economy.

Agrarians exercised a strong spirituality and a deep respect for the environment. There was a genuine concern for neighbors and co-workers. Being a leader was a major responsibility. In fact, farmers were like heroes because of their hard work, contributions to society, independence, and moral standards. A man’s word meant something. With the transition from an agrarian to industrial society, untainted leadership was lost.

The Industry Revolution meant major changes to the American way of life. Before that period, over 90% of Americans lived rurally. Farmers influenced society. Between 1870 and 1900, rural areas doubled and the urban regions tripled. Farmers were cautious about these societal changes.

Industrial managers faced challenges, such as generating new efficiencies while expanding operations. Chaos theory was in effect because those managers couldn’t control these organizational changes (both inside and outside). Factory managers lacked a process to motivate the unskilled (former agrarian) workforce. This era created new advances and new problems.

The Industrial Revolution forever changed agrarian society, primarily due to market economy and technology. Farmers were less self-sufficient and became “economic market” slaves. This created a conflict because farmers and industrial society had different values. Farming became more productive, but fewer farmers were needed.

As a result of these advances, farmers lost their independence, family focus, and societal influence on moral conduct. For example, some managers found factory workers breaking equipment. Consequently, managers tried to institute positive and negative rewards; these managers used conventional wisdom: “the hungriest man makes the best worker.” Once again, humanity was moving away from his calling—the land.

Therefore, advances in technology do not always equate to a better society. Many techno advocates would argue that technology has provided superior virtues. I beg to differ. First, technology doesn’t automatically improve society. In over 50 years, America has gone from rural to city and from national to international markets. Richard Critchfield, author of Trees, Why Do You Wait: America’s Changing Rural Culture, argues that these advancements have weakened our core values, such as family tradition and work ethic.

Secondly, the disintegration of the agrarian code has destroyed our moral stability. Osha Davidson, the author of Broken Heartlands, suggests that technology and the economic prestige of the agricultural system brought a host of social ills, such as poverty, depopulation, and soil erosion.

In closing, we may consider agrarian lifestyle primitive. However, agrarian values shouldn’t be forgotten as good leadership attributes. We continue to advance technology rapidly while the values of society continue to disintegrate with each innovation. In society, many leaders exhibit unethical conduct, pursuing wealth. Throughout American history, we see the consequences. Let’s pray it’s not too late for agrarian leadership.

Please discuss agrarian leadership as it relates to a changing world.

The Secret Formula to Connect with Generation Z Revealed: Creating Better Schools and Gaining More Profit in Business

Dr. Daryl Green presents useful strategies to help people better connect with Generation Z. With a greater understanding of this new generation, today’s business and academic institutions can reach success in more effective ways.

Dr. Daryl Green is an international researcher and author. In a recent seminar to educator and administrators in Oklahoma, he outlines how individuals can better connect with Generation Z, those who were born in 1995 and after. This generation is considered to be the most differs, global, entrepreneurial, and technological generation that ever exists in the world. Now in the United States, this generation places 26% of the total population. To know better about the Generation Z, the following statistics might help:

• 30% of them think that do not get applicable business skills needed for real life when they were students in college.

• 66% have an opinion that the technology exists now makes it possible for them to do anything.

• 72% of of this generation have a dream to build their own business.

• 76% argue that reaching their goals is now possible due to their online experiences.

• 79% show emotional distress whenever they can’ access their personal electronic devices.

Dr. Green has identified 5 main characteristics of Generation Z, they are technology dependent, culturally diverse and inclusive, independent thinkers, entrepreneurs, and socially conscious. The secret formula to dig out all of the potentials inside Z Generation consists of some important keys, include:

• Communicate in ways to get frequent feedback.

• Connect to them digitally.

• Give them chances to make innovation at the working place.

• Give instructions in smaller segments only.

• Give them practical and relevant experiences in their learning in the classroom.

Organizations need to foster good human capital behaviors. Every generation is different. We also bring our own generational biases into the workplace. However, Generation Z employees are a great asset to organizations with their fresh ideas and technology intuitiveness. We need to do a better job of handling them in the workplace than we did for Generation Y. If we are successful as leaders in doing this, there will be a huge return on investments,” Dr. Green said.

About Dr. Daryl D. Green

Dr. Daryl D. Green provides consulting, guidance, and management training for today’s business leaders. Dr. Green is also an award-winning author and professional speaker. Currently, he is the Dickinson Chair at Oklahoma Baptist University. In 2016, he retired from the Department of Energy as a senior engineer and program manager. Dr. Green has over 25 years of management experience and has been noted and quoted by USA Today, Ebony Magazine, and Associated Press. For more information, please visit www.drdarylgreen.com.

Contact:
Dr. Daryl Green
405-585-4414
Daryl.green@okbu.edu