Emerging Trends for Black America in 2021: African-American Experts Provide Hope to Millions About the Future

A panel of experts shares their market trends during Black History Month to foster better conditions for Black America in 2021.

During February’s observance of Black History Month, AGSM Consulting LLC gathered perspectives from experts in the fields of education, business, health care, social services, and media. A summary lists of observations and predictions for various market sectors.

Each panel member brought a unique perspective on Black America. One key conclusion reinforced in their analysis is that Black citizens continue to suffer disproportionately from the effects of COVID-19.

According to the National Urban League’s 2020 State of Black America Report,the economic devastation wreaked havoc on Black America, highlighting deeply rooted inequities in the economy. Black and Latino Americans are overrepresented in low-wage jobs that offer the least flexibility in working accommodations and increase their risk of exposure to the coronavirus. Their rates of coronavirus infections and deaths attributed to COVID-19 are higher. Additionally, Black and Latino’s workers are more likely to hold jobs that don’t offer health insurance benefits.

Unreliable information is another concern identified by the group. “In many cases, the Black community is flooded with misinformation,” said Dr. Daryl Green – a business strategist and author. “Yet, we have some brilliant people within our community. Therefore, it is important that the Black professionals share their expertise in order to propel this generation.”

Below are the key emerging trends for Black America in 2021, from a panel of experts working with AGSM Consulting on topics including  business, education, media, medical/health, and technology:

  • BUSINESS SECTOR – Employers search for employees across a global market. Companies are reaching out to emerging markets. Organizations are tapping talent from across the globe. In Globalization in transition: The future of trade and value chains, the McKinsey Global Institute noted the impact of globalization in today’s commerce: “Flows of services and data now play a much bigger role in tying the global economy together. In addition, all global value chains are becoming more knowledge-intensive. Low-skill labor is becoming less important as a factor of production.”
  • BUSINESS SECTOR – E-commerce and digital platforms will continue to dominate the business landscape. COVID-19 reinforced the power of the digital economy. If companies did not have a digital platform in 2020 with the lockdowns, they did not exist. According to Shopify, global B2C e-commerce sales are expected to reach $4.5 trillion by 2021.
  • BUSINESS SECTOR – A new work model is emerging. 2020 brought on an explosion in working from home due to COVID-19. Employees already wanted to have more flexibility in their work lives. They got it from employers. Companies responded by offering 70% of full-time workers the ability to work from home!
  • EDUCATION SECTOR – HBCUssee a resurgence in student enrollment. Raised awareness of social issues, increased private gifts, prominent HBCU alumni gracing headlines, and the many historical firsts achieved during 2020 spurred increased interest and enrollment of African American students at HBCUs. For example, the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff saw a 12% enrollment increase, the largest for UAPB in nearly ten years. North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University listed enrollment at 12,754, making it the largest HBCU
  • MEDIA SECTOR – Tough environment for public trust, advertising; but some gains in diversity: News consumers continue shifting from legacy media to digital options, exacerbating erosions in traditional advertising revenue – a major funding source for newsrooms. Surveys of the public show low regard for media integrity, especially associated with political coverage. Racial unrest sparked attention to diversity within media organizations, leading to the reassessment of content and promotions for several Black, Hispanic, and Asian journalists. In a tight market, job-seekers can expect more emphasis on in-demand skills – video, podcasts, storytelling, trustworthiness – for traditional and social media.
  • TECHNOLOGY SECTOR – AI and other automation continue to displace workers and industries. Artificial intelligence is a disruptive technology. Individuals should not seek to fight AI but work beside it. Thousands of jobs are being automated. According to a 2013 Oxford University study, nearly half of American jobs are at risk of being taken over by computers by 2033. Small businesses can leverage technology by empowering their employees to utilize AI where appropriate so that that technology is not viewed as a negative.

If individuals in the black community can empower themselves by understanding and acting on emerging trends, the future will be brighter for Black America in 2021.

To reach this panel of experts, please contact Dr. Green at drdarylgreen@gmail.com.

About These Panel Members:

Dr. Daryl. D. Green, DSL:

Owner with wife Estraletta of AGSM Consulting LLC, based in Tennessee. Professor and Dickinson Chair of Business at Oklahoma Baptist University. Retired from the U.S. Department of Energy in 2016, after 27 years as a senior engineer. Speaker and author of several books, including Job Strategies for the 21st CenturySmall Business Marketing, and Marketing for Professionals.

 Dr. Gloria Thomas Anderson:

Assistant professor of social work, North Carolina State University, and author of a CDC-recommended resource book for advance care planning called The African-American Spiritual and Ethical Guide to End-of-Life Care. She works extensively with healthcare and hospice organizations on implementing equitable healthcare decision-making strategies that include advance care planning (ACP) and end-of-life (EOL) care options for African-American communities.

 Caesar Andrews:

Professor and Distinguished Chair in Media Ethics and Writing, Reynolds School of Journalism, University of Nevada, Reno. A former editor for Gannett Co. at newsrooms in Florida, Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania, New York, and Detroit.

 Betty H. Blackman:

Nurse, Knoxville, Tenn. Owner of Health Spectrum Worksite Solutions, which provides health and safety training and consulting. The past executive director of People Empowering People Project (PEPP), which raises health awareness within the community. Consultant for corporate and private organizations.

Dr. Trina Jackson:

 an Associate Professor in the School of Business, Logistics and Entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech Community College in Northwest Indiana; U.S. Army veteran; doctorate dissertation was on “Community Response to Veterans Overcoming Barriers to Education.”  Continuum of Care organization focused on homelessness in Northwest Indiana. 

Media Contact

Dr. Daryl D. Greendrdarylgreen@gmail.com+1 (865) 719-72395322 Lance Drive Knoxville, TN 37909https://darylgreen.org/

Source : AGSM Consulting LLC

What’s Next for Black America in 2021? Today’s Experts Share Their Perspectives

A panel of experts shares their professional insight during Black History Month to foster better conditions for Black America in 2021.

A new U.S. presidential administration, ongoing civil unrest, the impact of the coronavirus pandemic, and a struggling economy are among areas to keep watching in 2021, according to African American experts sharing their assessments as the nation observes Black History Month this February. One key conclusion reinforced in their analysis is that Black citizens continue to suffer disproportionately from the effects of COVID-19.

According to the National Urban League’s 2020 State of Black America Report, the economic devastation wreaked havoc on Black America, highlighting deeply rooted inequities in the economy. Black and Latino Americans are overrepresented in low-wage jobs that offer the least flexibility in working accommodations and increase their risk of exposure to the coronavirus.

Unreliable information is another concern identified by the group. “In many cases, the Black community is flooded with misinformation,” said Dr. Daryl Green, a business strategist and author. “Yet, we have some brilliant people within our community. Therefore, it is important that Black professionals share their expertise in order to propel this generation.”

Dr. Trina Jackson, an Associate Professor in the School of Business, Logistics and Entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech Community College in Northwest Indiana, also identified communications hurdles, stated, “Understanding what’s going on in your communities is relevant in real-time. The challenge is being able to analyze and communicate this information.” Jackson noted that service workers are especially susceptible during this pandemic. “The least paid and the least acknowledged!”

Political climate and media performance are part of the debate.

“Right at a time when the public needs credible information on urgent matters such as the pandemic and the economy, the U.S. is experiencing a crisis of public trust,” said Caesar Andrews, a former editor and current educator in Nevada. “President Joe Biden promised a more forthright approach in managing key issues. And building community trust in factual news coverage is a significant preoccupation for journalists,” Andrews added.

Dr. Xan Polk, an Associate Professor in the School of Business, Economics, and Technology at King University, described a positive outcome of disruptions. Some historically Black Colleges and Universities are experiencing a surge in attention. According to Forbes magazine, 2020 was the year of the HBCU.

“African-American students are returning to HBCUs in record numbers,” Polk said, despite the pandemic. “Financial struggles have distressed all universities and colleges. Despite the distress, HBCUs continue to shine a light that seemingly beacons African Americans ‘back home.’”

Nurse Betty H. Blackman of Knoxville, Tenn., highlighted lingering health disparities in African American communities: “COVID exposed the glaring inequities as it relates to healthcare in the United States. The epidemic of diabetes and obesity, as well as other health disparities, have existed for years. This pandemic has put this matter at the forefront of society. It shows a true need to focus on changing conditions and outcomes for underserved communities.”

“African Americans’ lack of trust in the medical system is a decades-old barrier to proper health care,” said Dr. Lepaine Sharp-McHenry. “If we are going to address health disparities through a holistic approach, then families, churches, schools, healthcare agencies, and governments must be willing to commit and make fundamental and/or systematic changes at every level to address health disparities in every context!”

Sharp-McHenry recommended a more diverse corps of health professionals. “The need for more African American and Latino doctors, nurses, and other allied healthcare providers is greater today than ever before. Diversifying our healthcare providers will provide a workforce that minorities can feel supported by and trust.”

Dr. Gloria Thomas Anderson, assistant professor of social work at North Carolina State University and leading advance care planning expert, noted that disparities persist across the full spectrum of the health system. “Research shows that minoritized groups receive a lower quality of health care than non-Blacks. There are barriers to informed healthcare decision-making in the Black community, such as misinformation, myths, and mistrust of mainstream healthcare systems.”

“The patterns continue even during end-stage scenarios,” continued Anderson, whose expertise includes end-of-life care. “African Americans, in particular, are less likely to talk about end-of-life care issues. Making medical wishes known in advance, however, can lead to a better quality of healthcare that aligns with desired treatments and outcomes.” 

Each panel member brought a unique perspective on Black America.

To reach this panel of experts, please contact Dr. Green at drdarylgreen@gmail.com.

Dr. Daryl D. Green, DSL, Dr. Gloria Thomas Anderson, Caesar Andrews, Betty H. Blackman, Dr. Trina Jackson

About These Panel Members:

Dr Daryl. D. Green, DSL:

Owner with wife Estraletta of AGSM Consulting LLC, based in Tennessee. Professor and Dickinson Chair of Business at Oklahoma Baptist University. Retired from the U.S. Department of Energy in 2016, after 27 years as a senior engineer. Speaker and author of several books, including Job Strategies for the 21st CenturySmall Business Marketing, and Marketing for Professionals.

Dr. Gloria Thomas Anderson:

Assistant professor of social work, North Carolina State University, and author of a CDC-recommended resource book for advance care planning called The African-American Spiritual and Ethical Guide to End-of-Life Care. She works extensively with healthcare and hospice organizations on implementing equitable healthcare decision-making strategies that include advance care planning (ACP) and end-of-life (EOL) care options for African-American communities.

Caesar Andrews:

Professor and Distinguished Chair in Media Ethics and Writing, Reynolds School of Journalism, University of Nevada, Reno. A former editor for Gannett Co. at newsrooms in Florida, Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania, New York, and Detroit.

Betty H. Blackman:

Nurse, Knoxville, Tenn. Owner of Health Spectrum Worksite Solutions, which provides health and safety training and consulting. The past executive director of People Empowering People Project (PEPP), which raises health awareness within the community. Consultant for corporate and private organizations.

Dr. Trina Jackson:

An Associate Professor in the School of Business, Logistics and Entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech Community College in Northwest Indiana; U.S. Army veteran; doctorate dissertation was on “Community Response to Veterans Overcoming Barriers to Education.”  Continuum of Care organization focused on homelessness in Northwest Indiana. 

Dr. Lepaine Sharp-McHenry:

Nursing administrator; registered nurse since 1981. Worked in various clinical and management positions in long-term care, medical/surgical, and psychiatric mental health settings. Founding president of the Arkansas Directors of Nursing Administration in Long Term Care Association, nursing consultant, and past vice president of the National Association of Directors of Nursing Administration in Long Term Care.

Dr. Xan Polk:

An Associate Professor in the School of Business, Economics, and Technology at King University. She has over 15 years of professional management and marketing experience. Her research focuses on consumer behavior, marketing management, innovation, corporate social responsibility, and persuasive communication. Her work has been published in various peer-reviewed academic journals.

Media Contact

Dr. Daryl D. Greendrdarylgreen@gmail.com+1 (865) 719-7239http://www.drdarylgreen.com

Source : AGSM Consulting LLCCategories : EducationTags : Black America , Black History Month , African American History Month , 2021 Market Trends , 2021 Emerging Trends , Covid-19 , Coronavirus , US Economy , Daryl D. Green , Oklahoma Baptist University

2021 Market Trends: How to Help Today’s Small Businesses Succeed

Hilton Smith, a 60-year-old business owner, was a staple in his local community. His store of 100 years had passed 6 generations of owners. The business had seen good times and bad times. While his youngest son (a business degree) tried to help his dad adjust to the changing landscape, Hilton rejected these ideas, including having a website and developing a social media presence. Hilton barked at the idea of interacting with his customers virtually instead of in-person. Covid-19 hit the community. Lockdowns occupied. Hilton put a sign on his front door: “CLOSED INDEFINITELY!”

Bringing in a New Year creates a sense of renewal and opportunities. Yet, many small businesses have a ‘wait and see’ attitude riddled by uncertainty and unpredictability of the future. Most organizations have limited resources and must be cautious about their business growth. However, if small businesses were given a master list of areas to improve based on market forces, these companies would be in a better position for the upcoming year. This article examines the seven critical trends that small businesses should consider in the economy to better manage market disruption in their organization.

With the uncertainty of a new presidential administration in the United States and the lingering impacts of Covid, many organizations should rethink their business strategies. Small businesses are no exception.  According to a business study conducted between March 28 and April 4, 2020, small businesses have been heavily damaged by the lockdowns due to Covid-19.  In an analysis of more than 5,800 small businesses (reaching a network of 4.6 million small businesses), the research highlighted the damage caused by the pandemic. At this juncture, 43% of businesses had temporarily closed, and nearly all of these closures were due to COVID-19. Respondents stated that they had temporarily closed, largely pointed to reductions in demand and employee health concerns as the reasons for closure. In fact, the businesses, on average, reported having reduced their active employment by 39% since January. All industries have been impacted.  

Why evaluate emerging trends as a small business? Many larger companies can withstand the destructive nature of disruption in the marketplace. However, small businesses are more vulnerable. While incremental change is often slow and predictable, disruptive change can be characterized as rapid and unpredictable. These traits of disruption bring uncertainty into the marketplace. Managers worry. With market disruption, experience can be seen as a liability. McKinsey expert defines market disruption as “a profound change in the business landscape that forces organizations to undergo significant transformation rather than steady incremental changes.” Historical examples can be found in transportation (i.e., horse carriage to the automobile) to communications (i.e., telegraph to the Internet). Furthermore, the fact that nearly 9 of every 10 Fortune 500 companies in 1955 are gone today demonstrates the significance of market disruption. Yet, savvy businesses can take advantage of disruption if they understand the principles. Dr. Clayton Christenson, the author of The Innovator’s Dilemma, argues the opportunity brought by disruption: “Disruptive technologies typically enable new markets to emerge.

Looking ahead to 2021, there are seven trends that small businesses should consider. Yet, nearly a year after this pandemic, the full impacts on the U.S. economy are not fully clear. Small businesses should review the following trends to capture new, unmet customer needs in the future:

  • Global Market – We are connected! Small businesses can tap into resources worldwide, whether searching for new customers in emerging markets or locating talent for hire. According to the Global Trends 2030: Alternative Worlds, individual employment will accelerate due to globalization.
  • AI and Automation – Artificial intelligence is a disruptive technology. Companies can avoid the high expense of labor through automation. According to a 2013 Oxford University study, nearly half of American jobs are at risk of being taken over by computers by 2033. Small businesses can leverage technology by empowering their employees to utilize AI where appropriate so that that technology is not viewed as a negative.
  • New Work Model – 2020 brought in the explosion of working from home due to Covid-19.  Employees already wanted to have more flexibility in life. They got it from employers. Companies responded by offering 70% of full-time workers the ability to work from home!
  • Freelancing – Freelancing is part of the gig economy. It goes much further than Airbnb and Uber. In the gig economy, businesses hire independent contractors to perform individual jobs, called “gigs.” The total freelancing income is almost $1 trillion. With the gig economy, small businesses can find the necessary talent without the burden of full-time employees.
  • Digital & Ecommerce – Covid-19 ushered the digital economy.  If companies did not have a digital platform in 2020 with the lockdowns, they did not exist.  According to the Internet World Stats, there are currently 4,208,571, 287 internet users. Small businesses cannot afford to miss this continuing trend of digital platforms.
  • Changing Career Landscape – Due to market disruption, the employers’ needs continue to evolve, especially driven by automation and technology trends. Employers cannot afford to utilize unmotivated employees. They want self-starters. The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) has identified eight competencies associated with career readiness. Sadly, most students are not aware of employers’ expectations of career readiness competencies. With that said, small businesses will need to keep up with the changing workforce in the United States.
  • Continuous Learning – Keeping up with the latest trends and disruption requires a learning culture in organizations. Therefore, a trained employee pool is essential, especially during disruptions. With the numerous non-traditional learning platforms like Udemy and MOOC, individuals can stay up to date and advance their skills. Small businesses should be embracing this trend.

Today’s small businesses and entrepreneurs must retool themselves, given the potential impacts of Covid-19 have the necessary capacity to change their way of thinking because of their passion. Disruption will be the word of 2021 as organizations consider the impacts of Covid-19 in 2020. This article discussed the seven critical trends that small businesses should consider in the economy to better manage market disruption in their organization. While larger organizations may survive the impacts of market disruptions, most small businesses cannot. By taking the necessary steps to understand these market trends and maximize capturing unmet needs in the market, small businesses can make a positive investment in their future. Let’s pray that it is not too late.

© 2021 by D. D. Green

About Dr. Daryl Green:

Dr. Daryl Green provides consulting, guidance, and management training for today’s small businesses. He is the Dickinson Chair at Oklahoma Baptist University. He and his students have assisted more than 100 small businesses in the region with marketing and management expertise. If you would like more information about this article or business assistance, please contact Dr. Green at drdarylgreen@gmail.com or visit http://www.drdarylgreen.com.


“The Impact of COVID-19 on Small Business Outcomes and Expectations” by Alexander W. Bartik, Marianne Bertrand, Zoe Cullen, Edward L. Glaeser, Michael Luca, and Christopher Stanton

“What is Market Disruption?” by Becky Kelderman

OBU Micro-Internship with YMCA

Students at Oklahoma Baptist University worked with Shawnee YMCA during the Fall semester to assist with their Social Media marketing techniques. The two students Jamie Edwards and Deise Ferrara were students in the Marketing Analytics and Intel class.

This class is taught by Dr. Daryl Green, assistant professor of business and Dickinson Chair of Business. This micro internship allows students to gain real experience and applying what we learn in class to the working world.

The two students with Shawnee YMCA focused on improving online presence through Facebook, Instagram and Twitter as well as developing ideas for fund raisers.

Jamie said, “ Working with Christina Roach and Dr. Green I have definitely learnt how to adapt and implement what I have learnt and how to apply this knowledge working with real companies. Analysing and comparing social media’s in conjunction to what I have learnt has helped me understand what really works when improving a business through digital marketing, as well as witness my work come to life and benefit the company.’

The students were focused on improving the Shawnee YMCA’s  presence on Instagram by improving the page’s content. Students also worked on upgrading the website discussing a Digital media checklist on all platforms.

Deise said, “This micro-internship was such a great experience. I love the fact that I was able to get some hands-on experience. I believe that everything I have learned I can take with me and incorporate into my future career. Tina Roach was incredibly helpful and a great person to collaborate with on this micro-internship. I am so glad that Jamie and I were able to take our class knowledge and apply it towards this micro-internship. I am so grateful to Dr. Green and OBU for offering such exceptional opportunities.”

The mission of the Paul Dickinson College of Business is to provide a quality, Christian-based education to students pursuing a bachelor’s degree in business. OBU’s business degree programs are nationally accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs. For more information on studying business at OBU, visit www.okbu.edu/business

To learn more about this pilot program or to participate as a business partner or mentor get in touch with Dr. Daryl D. Green at daryl.green@okbu.edu or 405-585-4414.

Non-Profit Beats Covid Setbacks

Students Get Real Marketing Exposure Through OBU Class

Oklahoma Baptist University students Jocelyn Martinez and Emily Wilmoth worked with Legacy Parenting Center, a non-profit organization in the community, as a part of their marketing analytics class. They helped the company further their understanding of analytics, increase marketing tactics, and ultimately aided in overcoming challenges presented by COVID-19. 

Dr. Daryl Green, Associate Professor of Business and Dickinson Chair of Business, created a way to allow students to gain real world experience while implementing material learned inside the classroom. These micro-internships Dr. Green explains, “In most universities, there is a huge gap between employers’ expectations and college students’ expectations about employment.  Most businesses put a premium on work experience.  Yet, universities do not stress this fact enough in my humble opinion.  Through the micro internships, we provide our OBU students with practical work experience while allowing them to assist an organization with a business problem. During this process, students are building their skill set rights during class time.  Even during Covid-19, our business students have been able to achieve results for business clients in these micro internships.”

Martinez and Wilmoth paired with Legacy Parenting center, which has a mission of “building stronger, healthier families through education, resources, and mentoring.” They successfully help impact people by providing information and resources while embodying their mission. They continued to do this throughout the pandemic, even if it had to be remote for some time.

The students worked with Lacey Holt, executive director of Legacy Parenting Center, to provide marketing research, social media content, and interpretation of marketing analytics. They spent time reviewing the company’s website and social media pages in order to help the company improve their content and reach more people. The staff was able to gain a better understanding of analytics and what to do with the data provided. The students continued to follow website and social media traffic that will ultimately give the company a better grasp on where to go moving forward.

“What we focused on first was helping them optimize their webpage. We then focused on their marketing and helped them better understand how analytics play a huge role. We explained that they should look at data to know what is working, what’s not, and most importantly, what needs to be changed,” Martinez said, reflecting on her experience. “Also, I enjoyed working with LPC so much because we constantly saw the impact they made on the community, it made our small contribution feel rewarding and valued.”

“Working with Legacy this semester has been a great experience,” explained Wilmoth. “It is vital that they understand how their content and marketing affects their company. We have been able to help them with this, as well as give them insight into how they can extend their reach to more people. They provide resources for many people in the community and it makes me feel good to know that our efforts may help more potential clients find the company and receive the assistance they need.”

To learn more about this pilot program or to participate as a business partner or mentor get in touch with Dr. Daryl D. Green at daryl.green@okbu.edu or 405-585-4414.

Marketing Students at OBU Work with OCAST to Develop their Online Presence

In the fall of 2020, in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic, two marketing students had the privilege of interning with the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Technology and Science (OCAST). OCAST is a government funded agency whose goal is to provide resources for entrepreneurial science and technology businesses in order to aid them in their early stages of innovation. These students worked on this project primarily with Amy Walton, the Director of Government Relations and Strategic Initiatives here in Shawnee, Oklahoma.

Students Jackson Winn and Jarrett Ellis worked on developing the online presence of OCAST in order to raise more awareness of the goals of the company for the future. Their tasks consisted of developing new video logos, making sure all the social media platforms were consistent, and brainstorming ways that their online presence was modern and eye-catching. Some of the ways this was accomplished was through using clients on Fiverr and meeting weekly with Amy about potential ideas for the company. 

Jarrett mentioned that this project was a great experience because it helped him gain a completely different perspective on STEM businesses and the role they play in Oklahoma’s economy.

Caption:  Jarrett and Jackson work remotely with Amy.

Working with Amy at OCAST was a one of a kind experience that provided me with real world knowledge into the science and technology businesses of Oklahoma” 

Furthermore, Jackson mentioned that this micro-internship experience gave him real world marketing experience that he had never gained before. 

Through this internship, I have gained valuable knowledge of evaluating the online presence of a company and it was so great to be able to work with a client who has much experience in the business world

To learn more about OCAST and the mission of the company, visit www.ok.gov/ocast. Additionally, to learn more about the College of Business at OBU, visit www.okbu.edu/business

To learn more about this pilot program or to participate as a business partner or mentor get in touch with Dr. Daryl D. Green at daryl.green@okbu.edu or 405-585-4414.

OBU Marketing Students Assist Larry Gill Advisory in Online Branding & Tracking Analytics

Marketing students from Oklahoma Baptist University had the recent opportunity to work with Larry Gill Advisory and gain hands-on experience within the realms of digital marketing and marketing analytics. Larry Gill Advisory boasts the services of Larry Gill, a financial advisor under Sowell Management, with over 50 years of experience in the industry.

Students Zoe Charles and Laura Stewart formed a team, under the supervision of Dr. Daryl Green, to work with Gill and help him establish an online presence in order to create more awareness for his services. Alongside establishing an online presence, Charles and Stewart also provided multiple detailed analysis to guide Gill on how to better survey and stand-out from local competition. 

Working with Charles and Stewart has been Larry Gill Advisory’s first venture into the world of online marketing with Gill stating, “[p]rior to working with Laura and Zoe, I have done virtually no marketing.  Clients have come from referrals from existing clients and personal contacts.”

Gill also said of the team’s accomplishments, “Laura and Zoe have created a professional Facebook page that has received significant attention.  They have updated my LinkedIn presence and are creating a website for Larry Gill Advisory. Through their efforts, my practice has become more visible.”

Both Charles and Stewart were grateful for the opportunity with Stewart saying, “I am so thankful for the experience I have gained through this micro-internship. I have learned how to apply the marketing concepts [we have learned] in class to real-life scenarios. It has given me an opportunity to be creative and has shown me how much I enjoy helping people market their business!”

When it comes to utilizing marketing interns from Dr. Daryl Green’s students Mr. Gill said, “If you wish to work with dedicated, competent, goal-oriented students in an effort to assist them while they add value to your business and to your life, sign up.”

OBU Business Students Assist Local Organizations During COVID-19

Students of the Paul Dickinson College of Business of Oklahoma Baptist University assist local organizations to help cope with the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Paul Dickinson College of Business of Oklahoma Baptist University (OBU) has always demonstrated their commitment to helping businesses grow by offering marketing assistance to business owners around the globe. Dr. Daryl D. Green and his undergraduate students have again substantiated this claim as they continued research and class assignments even as the COVID-19 wreaked havoc on many businesses and their revenue.

Dr. Green and his current crop of OBU business students provided management and marketing consultation to 11 organizations in the Fall Semester despite the Covid-19 impact. Dr. Green, DSL, Business Professor, has used his class assignments to build a cadre of undergraduate students that can offer management and marketing assistance while operating remotely.

“We have been fortunate that over 80% of our courses were face-to-face while many universities went online. Given our micro internship pilot program, I was able to facilitate the partnering of our students with local businesses. Therefore, we were allowing our students to see the practical application of business theories to practical application,” said Dr. Green.

Three classes, MGMT 3213 (Leadership and Organizational Change), MGMT 3453 (Project Management), and MKTG 3323 (Marketing Analytics), were involved in the program, with over 30 students participating in the micro internship program.

Caption: Andre and Jessilyn Head work with the project management class on several deliverables.

Students in MGMT 3453 assisted The Coltrane Group in key project tasks. The group is a stakeholder in the arts, entertainment, and recreation industry and was run by the late Andre Head and Jessilyn Head, Founders. Jessilyn explained, “We are very thankful and appreciative of the work that was done by the students.”

Caption: Zoe Charles and Laura Stewart worked to build Financial Advisor Larry Gill’s online presence for his company.

Marketing students Zoe Charles and Laura Stewart also formed a team that worked with Larry Gill Advisory in Shawnee, Oklahoma, helping the firm establish an online presence to create more awareness for his services. “Working with Mr. Gill this semester has given me the opportunity to learn how to evaluate a company, help them make their marketing situation better, and give them direction for future success,” said Laura.

Dr. Green and his business students also developed a report to help big business owners, entrepreneurs, and SMEs achieve personal and business growth, especially in this trying time of COVID-19 pandemic and financial crisis.

For more information about this story and other projects from The Paul Dickinson College of Business, please visit – www.okbu.edu/business.

About Paul Dickinson College of Business

The Paul Dickinson College of Business is a part of the Oklahoma Baptist University. The Christian-based institution aims to meet the needs of individuals pursuing a bachelor’s degree in business, providing the skills needed to achieve success in contemporary professional careers as a leader. The business degree programs of the Oklahoma Baptist University are accredited and acknowledged by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs.

Hoping to Save Businesses During COVID-19, OBU MBA Offers Marketing Assistance Across the US

Being a college poised to help businesses grow and offer marketing assistance to business owners around the globe, The Paul Dickinson College of Business of OBU has made available novel marketing assistance to business organizations. Dr. Daryl D. Green, along with his MBA students, made this happen through research and class assignments. This has been successfully done even when COVID-19 continues to wreak havoc on many businesses and affects their revenue. Dr Green and his current crop of OBU MBA students are providing marketing consultation to 16 organizations across the United States this semester despite the Covid-19 impact.

Therefore, at Oklahoma Baptist University, Dr. Green, DSL, Business Professor, has used his class assignments to build a cadre of graduate and undergraduate students that can offer marketing assistance across the globe.

“Our MBA students have managed to take theories from the classroom to assist organizations with their marketing problems. This is because OBU believes theories must be practiced and concretized if we are going to have reasonable achievements, help businesses, mitigate the impacts of COVID-19 on businesses and achieve the essence of education, which is to help their society,” said Dr Green.

However, it is a fact that the MBA students under the tutelage of Dr Green have done the research and this action to help businesses in the middle of the Coronavirus pandemic and their own personal challenges. As Paul Dickinson College of Business of OBU is duly established to always give students tools that they can use today, not just tomorrow, Dr Green and his MBA weren’t discouraged with Coronavirus pandemic outbreak but instead continued to research through class assignments, peer-review and other academic activities to help the MBA students turn theories into reality and help businesses across the globe.

Dr. Green, professor of this group of MBA students, used a class project to help local communities struggling during Covid-19. Having done professional engineering management, he knows the value of practical experience for his graduate students. In 2016, Dr. Green retired from the Department of Energy, where he worked as a senior engineer for over 27 years.

Below is a highlight of the Paul Dickinson College of Business MBA students and their supervisor who contributed to the assignment:


 Caption: Devan Costa-Cargill provided marketing assistance to Swirling Arrow Pack and Harness Waterford, California.

Devan Costa-Cargill, who is an OBU MBA Student, provided marketing assistance to Swirling Arrow Pack and Harness Waterford, California. She is an entrepreneur and teacher. After obtaining her Bachelor in Sociology from University California Santa Cruz, Devan entered the public-school system, specifically Special Education.


Caption: Nick Hostetter provided marketing assistance to The Barn Athletics in Choctaw, Oklahoma.

MBA Student Nick Hostetter provided marketing assistance to The Barn Athletics in Choctaw, Oklahoma. Hostetter is the Customer Service Manager for APMEX Inc. and has been with this organization since 2017. From 2016 to 2017, he was an Operations Supervisor for AB InBev. He was a Logistics Supervisor for corporate Love’s from 2013 to 2016 where the team he oversaw was responsible for over one billion dollars in fuel deliveries per year.


 Caption: MBA Student Jocelyn Martinez used her marketing skills outside of the US with The Nouva Agency in Monterrey, N.L, Mexico.

MBA Student Jocelyn Martinez used her marketing skills outside of the US with The Nouva Agency in Monterrey, N.L, Mexico. Martinez is from Mexico. Currently, she is a Senior Student-Athlete at Oklahoma Baptist University, pursuing a BBA in Management and Marketing with a passion for Digital Marketing Analytics.


Caption: MBA Student Jason Proctor provided local marketing assistance to Wallace Avenue Baptist Church in Shawnee, Oklahoma.

MBA Student Jason Proctor provided local marketing assistance to Wallace Avenue Baptist Church in Shawnee, Oklahoma. Proctor is the Head Men’s and Women’s Tennis Coach at Oklahoma Baptist University (OBU). He is originally from Tulsa, Oklahoma.


Caption: Dr. Daryl D. Green, DSL, Business Professor, has used his class assignments to build a cadre of graduate and undergraduate students who can offer marketing assistance across the globe.

For more information about this story, please contact Dr. Green at daryl.green@okbu.edu or 405-585-4414.

About Paul Dickinson College of Business

The Paul Dickinson College of Business is part of Oklahoma Baptist University. This qualified and Christian-based education is addressed to those who want to pursue a bachelor degree in business. The university provides the skills needed by the business graduates in contemporary professional careers as a leader. The business degree programs of the Oklahoma Baptist University are accredited and acknowledged by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs.

For more information on the Paul Dickinson College of Business at OBU, visit www.okbu.edu/business.

The Disruptive Nature of COVID-19: Researchers Suggest New Faculty Model

The coronavirus situation has led to disruptive changes in the academic workflow of students in universities and colleges. With an ongoing volatile market, higher education has been impacted immensely with a direct connotation about underachieving and unprepared pass outs from these educational institutes. This has also propagated stark declining numbers in college enrolments and projections and surveys across the United States point at as much as 450,000 drops in students in years beyond 2025. Previous research, undertaken by Harvard professor, DR. Clayton Christensen also states that in the scope of organizational sustainability in educational institutes, disruptive changes and innovation will lead to 50% of 4,000 colleges and universities in the country to go bankrupt in the next 10 to 15 years.

Dr. Daryl D. Green and Dr. Jack McCann suggest a new faculty model to infuse student-centered learning the midst of disruption in higher education. Their research examines a new faculty model that includes an entrepreneurial mindset to stimulate innovation and creativity in the constant, changing environment in higher education.   In researching the current crises in higher education, this paper describes a set of strategic implications that will aid faculty wishing to create sustainability education programs.  

Caption:  Dr. Green and Dr. McCann bring more than 50 years of corporate experience to academia.

Higher education is under tremendous pressure due to market disruption. In fact, economic pressures are forcing higher education to make drastic decisions especially strategic vision, curriculum, hiring, and vision.               Furthermore, many people are questioning the value of higher education with growing pressures centered on the merit of post-secondary education against student debt and job readiness. In addition, businesses, government officials, and the general public complain about the number of unprepared college graduates produced by today’s colleges and universities.  According to a Pew Research study, 61% of Americans believe that the higher education system in the United States is going in the wrong direction. Dr. Clayton Christensen, who has done extensive research on organization sustainability and disruptive innovation, conveyed doubt about the future of traditional universities; he has argued that in15 years from now half of US universities may be in bankruptcy. Dr. Green argues that the status quo isn’t enough: “Disruption is all around us. Gen Z students are demanding more value for their education.  I’m big on practical experience and engaging our students with innovating thinking. That behavioural is what we are talking about in an entrepreneurial mindset for faculty.

Caption:  Dr. Green pushes his business students to utilize the entrepreneurial spirit in assisting local businesses with difficult market problems.

In their article, Dr. Green and Dr. McCann argue that today’s faculty must transform academic institutions with an entrepreneurial mindset.  Dr. McCann adds, our research focused on a new faculty model that includes an entrepreneurial mindset to stimulate innovation and creativity in the constant, changing environment in higher education.  In analyzing the current crises in higher education, our paper describes a set of strategic implications that will aid faculty wishing to create sustainability education programs.”

To view this research, please visit at https://www.arjonline.org/american-research-journal-of-business-and-management/volume-6.  

For more information about the researchers, you may contact Dr. Green at daryl.green@okbu.edu or 405-585-4414 

About the Researchers

Dr. Green is the Dickinson Chair and an Associate professor in the College of Business at Oklahoma Baptist University. The Paul Dickinson College of Business is part of Oklahoma Baptist University. This qualified and Christian-based education is addressed to those who want to pursue a bachelor degree in business. The university provides the skills needed by the business graduates in contemporary professional careers as a leader. The business degree programs of the Oklahoma Baptist University are accredited and acknowledged by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs.  He is a former US Department of Energy program manager with over 25 years of professional management experience. He is a nationally syndicated columnist, where he writes in the areas of leadership, decision-making, and culture. Dr. Green has a doctoral degree in Strategic Leadership from Regent University.

Dr. Jack McCann currently serves an appointment at Union College in Barbourville, KY, as Associate Professor in Marketing and Business. He teaches courses in management, marketing, and other business topics. Prior to joining Union College in August of 2018, he served an appointment as Dean of the School of Business at Lincoln Memorial University in Harrogate, TN, from 2008-2014. His research interests are leadership, management, marketing, emerging markets, sustainability, and corporate strategy and ethics. He also has many years of management experience in operations, business ownership, consulting, and customer service. 

For more information on this research or these researchers, please contact Dr. Green at www.okbu.edu/business.