Dance Party: Tribute to Black Music in America

85230262_3060621337302530_3868820597941207040_o

Put on your best 70’s attire and join us to dance the night away!

Dr. Daryl Green presents the 70’s, 80’s & ‘More’ Dance Party: A Tribute to Black Music in America. Join us on Friday, February 21, 2020, from 7:00 pm to 10:00 pm at the Geiger Center Ballroom, OBU. Entry is FREE! Donations are requested to support the African American Scholarships in Business College.

This event will feature:

  • OBU Big Horn Band
  • Group Dance Lessons – Swing & Hustle
  • Prizes
  • 70’s Costume Theme

For more information, please contact Dr. Green at daryl.green@okbu.edu.

2020 Black History Month Program

 

86259992_3060753330622664_6247529303584538624_oJoin us to enjoy the 2020 Black History Month Program sponsored by the Dickinson College of Business. This dynamic event will take place on Monday, February 24, 2020 at 10am at Oklahoma Baptist University

Our speaker of the hour will be Andre Head, President of The Coltrane Group. He will be speaking on the topic: Black Wall Street and Black Towns: Economic Development in Black Communities

Do You Enjoy Your Job in 2020? Mapping Out Life After Retirement

“In my early 40s, I started thinking about retiring early. I sat through my organization’s mid-career retirement classes and had gotten several retirement estimates (i.e., different retirement years). I had kept myself marketable by continuing to take advantage of career opportunities and obtaining additional education in my professional field. Some co-workers mocked me because they said any scholarly education would not advance my career. 

Yet, I felt that professional growth and a continual learning mindset would only increase my value in the market. I had developed an exit strategy. Working with my friend (Dr. Gary Roberts), I had mapped out a future purpose in academia. However, things did not work out as planned. In fact, it took 9 years and more than 200 job applications for the exit strategy to work. Having an exit strategy was invaluable!”

Are you happy with your current job? Are you working in a job and the environment that you hate and bring you hate? If so, let 2020 be different. In general, US employees are satisfied with their work-life. According to a 2016 Pew Research Center study, about half (49%) of American workers say they are very satisfied with their current job. 

Yet, 30% of them are somewhat satisfied, and the remainder says they are slightly dissatisfied (9%) or very dissatisfied (6%). When individuals are not happy at work, this mindset impacts other aspects of their lives. When I wrote my own ‘soul searching’ book, Mapping Out Life After Retirement, I hope to assist prospective and current retirees on how to have a more fulfilled life. This article discusses how individuals can retire early with the right kind of strategy.

Retiring early is a difficult task in today’s financial requirements for living. In 2016, I retired from my career of 27 years at the age of 50 years old. To retire early is indeed a blessing from God. However, I had planned my exit strategy for several years. Yet, millions of Boomers may not be physically and mentally ready for retirement savings today to retire. In the Insured Retirement Institute (IRI) survey, “Boomers Expectations for Retirement 2016, there are some startling statistics that will clarify some of the challenges for a Baby Boomer retirement:

  • The percentage of Baby Boomers who are satisfied with how their lives are going from an economic perspective has fallen to 43%, which is the lowest level since 2011.
  • Boomers are less confident than they were five years ago about almost every aspect of retirement.
  • Among the 55% of Boomers with retirement savings, 58% have saved $100,000 or more for retirement. When Boomers work with financial advisors, this increases to 78%.
  • Only one in four Boomers expect significant income from an employer-provided pension.
  • One in five Boomers are worried they will not have enough savings for necessary expenses.

Some individuals do not want to sit at home after retirement. Other people want to explore their vocation. To these people, I will provide a new term for them; ‘rebooting.’ In the computer/software world, rebooting is a normal function, unlike retiring. Rebooting is defined as “starting a computer a second or a third time, often necessary after a system crash or malfunction.” 

In the career planning space, I define rebooting ‘as an individual who has retired and decided to continue working. In this line of thinking, an individual may move away from his/her past career path and pivot to a totally different occupation of vocation. This situation is feasible. Most individuals, especially Boomers or GenXers, are in careers that they hate only because of the necessity of income.  

As the statistics have shown, there are many reasons why many folks will not retire anytime soon due to the current economic conditions and their lack of serious planning. In this case, retiring early will take a different strategy to be successful. Thus, sitting down and mapping out a personal exit strategy for retirement is critical. Based on my exit strategy that I utilized in my retirement, below are some simple suggestions for developing your exit strategy for retirement:

  1. Talk with retirees about the pros and cons of retirement. 
  2. Establish objectives/goals for retirement.
  3. Pick a realistic date for retirement.
  4. Evaluate current financial and lifestyle situation.
  5. Research materials on retirement.
  6. Take company/organization-sponsored retirement courses.
  7. Talk with several financial planners about your personal goals.
  8. Come up with a magical number that makes retirement possible.
  9. Talk with trusted family and friends about exit strategy on retirement. 
  10. Surround yourself with individuals who will support your decision, but are willing to give you honest, candid feedback. 
  11. Develop and implement your exit strategy once developed.
  12. Know your worth in the market (especially in job hunting).
  13. Be happy and content with your decision! I’ve met people who habitually second-guess themselves in every decision that they make.

Without a good exit strategy, retiring early will be a fairy tale and not a reality for many people.

This article showed how individuals can retire early with the right kind of strategy. Some working professionals rely on the fact that they have significant incomes. Yet, they live miserable lives in the process. Thus, these individuals dream about retirement as a way of living a more filled life. What is holding you back in your retirement plans? Let’s get started!

© 2020 by Dr. Daryl D. Green


About Dr. Daryl Green:

Dr. Daryl Green provides consulting, guidance, and management training for today’s business leaders. He is the Dickinson Chair at Oklahoma Baptist University. In 2016, he retired as a Senior Engineer and Program Manager with the Department of Energy after a successful career. He is the author of Mapping Out Life After Retirement. Dr. Green has over 25 years of management experience and has been noted and quoted by USA Today, Ebony Magazine, and Associated Press. For more information, please visit http://www.darylgreen.org.

5 Leadership Lessons from My Mother’s Death: Empowering Followers to Succeed

“Our 82-year-old mother was gone. It was a startling surprise to her three adult children. We each have a special relationship with her; we simply called her ‘Mama!’ Now, we were challenged with the tasks of planning our mother’s funeral services. We had never worked together entirely on any single project. Mama was always the senior project manager giving  instruction to us as children: Gail – fix your sister’s hair, Daryl – go find your father, Lottie – practice your piano, and Mary – allow your sister to do your hair. Yet, at this moment, no commands were being given by Mama. We were solo pilots now. Mama anticipated there were going to be disagreements, as we started a debate about one of the sticking points of our mother’s funeral arrangements at Lester’s home. Lester went into the back room and gave us a hand-written letter from Mama dated a few days before her death.  We were stunned. The letter carefully addressed our disagreement. Since it was clear what Mama’s expectations were on this matter, we stopped the argument and started implementing our mother’s wishes. She had managed to lead us through this problem. Mama had given us another leadership lesson.”

In today’s hectic environment, many executives and business professionals are so overwhelmed by demanding shareholders, boards, and customers that they forget about the lessons from everyday life. In December, I lost my mother – Annette Green Elias. Although it was painful to see her leave Planet Earth, I was encouraged when I reflected on my mother’s legacy and what she and my father had taught us. My mother was a good example of how to model the behavior you desire in your family. This quality is also true for organizations. James Kouzes and Barry Posner, authors of The Leadership Challenge, outline the critical nature of leadership modeling: “When it comes to deciding whether a leader is believable, people first listen to the words; then they watch the actions. They listen to the talk and watch the walk. Then, they measure the congruence… Actions, then, are the evidence of a leader’s commitment.” If you are going to be an effective leader, you must model the way. Followers will not respect just lip service. Our mother was a good example of leading us to her vision. This article examines five leadership lessons learned from my mother’s death.

Leadership is a quality that doesn’t change over time or through generations. There are many definitions of leadership. However, one simple definition of leadership is: “the art of motivating a group of people to act towards achieving a common goal.” My mother was part of ‘The Greatest Generation’ – those individuals who were born from 1910 to 1945. Individuals born during this time suffered through the Great Depression and World War II. There aren’t many of these people left. Over 1,000 war veterans are passing away per day. Like my mother, these individuals born at that time can be described by the following characteristics: dedicated, hardworking, loyal, close to family, love of God. Within this generation, there were distinct roles. The father was the provider and protector of the family. From my father, I learned the importance of hard work and keeping your word. The mother was the nourisher and caregiver of the family. Since my mother had to work to ‘make ends meet’ financially, I learned how to empathize and give to the needs of others. My mother always stated, “I know all my kids and what they are capable of doing.” With that said, my mother saw something else in me that led her to give me tasks that would further develop me as a leader. She was a Proverb 31 woman who garnishes respect in the community. Dr. Peter Northouse, the author of Leadership, notes, “From this perspective, leadership emergence is the degree to which a person fits with the identity of the group as a whole or they become most like the group prototype. Being similar to the prototype makes leaders attractive to the group and gives them influence with this group. If you are a leader and your followers are not engaged, what are you really doing as a leader? Leadership matters!

During the funeral arrangement process with my siblings, Lottie and Mary, I reflected on how my mother had shaped us as children to become responsible adults today. Mother definitely helped shape me as a leader. As we come to the close of another year, there are some invaluable leadership lessons discovered during my mother’s passing:

  • HAVE A FAITH – In 2018, our mother had a brain aneurysm, fell, and broke her pelvis. Lying in the hospital, our mother was depressed, anxious, and in despair. Doctors thought she might never walk, but she did. At 82 years old, she was working, driving, and traveling in 2019. Leaders will eventually run across situations where they are powerless and hopeless. A strong faith will sustain a leader.  
  • KNOW YOUR FOLLOWERS – My mother routinely told us: “I know all my kids and what they are capable of doing.” She recognized that each of her children were different. While one child might need encouragement, another child might need tough love to help them navigate. Likewise, leaders need to understand their employees in order to get the best out of them.
  • BUILD AN ORGANIZATION THAT THIRST FOR LEARNING – Learning was part of the family dynamics and an unwritten expectation. My mother went back to college in her late 60s to encourage her grandchildren to seek higher learning beyond high school. She instilled a need for learning. Effective organizations need to create this desire.
  • STAND UP FOR YOURSELF – When we were growing up, our mother told us this before going to school: “If someone HIT you, you…. HIT THEM BACK.” OK! This mandate got us into trouble… sometimes. Yet, what my mother taught us was more than picking a fist fight. You must stand up to the principles that you believe. In the business world, there are times when a leader must stand by himself or herself.
  • HAVE YOUR OWN PLAN 

Because of the problems that families were having after the death of a loved one, we tried to convince our mother to have a will so that everyone would understand her wishes. Our mother would not listen. She said, “I have raised you all the right way; you should be able to figure it out.” She never did write that Will. But—Mama had her own plan. She left her instructions in a manilla envelope addressed to her children. She had left her children with no debt, had a prepaid funeral arrangement, written her funeral program, and left us a letter describing her wishes. We, the children, were all shocked. Mother had managed to implement her own plan. Likewise, leaders need to have a plan. Yet, the plan does not have to be like other leaders. Create a unique plan for your situation.

In closing, good life lessons are invaluable to leadership development. Perhaps, you are also lamenting the loss of your mother or a loved one this year. My mother is gone now, but she left a legacy of meaningful leadership lessons. She had a clear vision of leadership. To mother, leader’s vision was an action word. Dr. Jimmy Atkins, the author of Leading Strategic Community Change, suggests the power of vision: “The vision must go beyond lofty dreams and be put into action… Leaders must bring the vision to life by rolling up their sleeves and participating with everyone else.” My mother breathed the leadership qualities into me. This article demonstrated that there are leadership lessons that today’s organizations can learn from others especially mothers. Both leaders and followers can use this time of reflection to seek to learn from what you learned from your mother. 

Let’s pray that it is not too late.

 

© 2019 by Daryl D. Green

About Dr. Daryl Green:

Dr. Daryl Green provides consulting, guidance, and management training for today’s business leaders. He is the Dickinson Chair at Oklahoma Baptist University. In 2016, he retired as a senior engineer and program manager with the Department of Energy after a successful career. Dr. Green has over 25 years of management experience and has been noted and quoted by USA Today, Ebony Magazine, and Associated Press. For more information, please visit http://www.drdarylgreen.com.

Celebrating Thanksgiving With Personal Philanthropy in Today’s Leaders

Examine how to grow personal philanthropy in today’s leaders.

In many organizations, the personal trait of giving to others is not often admired by others due to the competitive environment. However, building personal philanthropy in today’s leaders could make organizations to flourish. Businesses that are built on teamwork and supporting others offer an unselfish environment. According to Craig Hickman, author of Mind of A Manager, leaders empower people by creating organizational cultures in which people gain a sense of meaning from their work. Hickman notes, “In our economy and society, the leadership-driven organization fulfills the vital role of breaking with current tradition and past approaches in order to innovate and bring about breakthroughs that benefit everyone. Such organizations can help us find new solutions to old problems in ways that management-dominated organizations never can. This role demands strong leadership.” The article examines how to grow personal philanthropy in today’s leaders.

Leaders must model the way in personal philanthropy, and this giving mindset must be strategic in nature.  James Kouzes and Barry Posner, premier leadership experts and authors of The Leadership Challenge, argue the importance of leaders modeling the way: “When it comes to deciding whethera leader is believeable, people first listen to the words; then they watch the actions…Actions, then, are the evidence of a leader’s commitment.” According to Vanguardcharitable.org, a strategic philanthropist can be defined as “one who follows a long-term giving plan, one that includes a budget, investment strategy, appropriate time horizon, and specific goals for a charitable impact that allow for current and future success.” When most people think about philanthropy, they think about the wealthy among us, such as Bill Gates or Warren Buffet. Personal philanthropy can be so much more than that. In fact, individuals can have the same philanthropist mindset when giving to organizations or people. Social responsibility is a buzzword in a society demanding more accountability from its corporate citizens. Social responsibility speaks to a company’s stance on the way its managers and employees view their duty or obligation to make decisions that protect, enhance, and promote the well-being of stakeholders and society as a whole. 

Gareth Jones and Jennifer George, authors of Contemporary Management, argue about the importance of social responsibility: “The way a company announces business problems or admits its mistakes provides strong clues about its stance on social responsibility.” With the economic crisis, there are many institutions in trouble. For example, Noriko Chapman is a prominent manager in Tennessee in the automotive industry. In her co-authored book, Second Chance, Noriko pledged 30% of her book proceeds to the Tennessee Rehabilitation Center in Maryville, a regional rehabilitation center that provides the following services to adults with disabilities. She was leveraging her expertise to support a local community cause. Noriko’s giving attitude helped the Center’s financial needs. With the current economic crisis and the holiday season before us, citizens should use personal philanthropy as an option to improve society.

Yet, philanthropy must start with a mindset and an attitude for giving regardless of where a person stands on the economic ladder. Marc Benioff, Chairman & CEO of Salesforce.com, built his organization with a philanthropic focus. Salesforce.com is a cloud computing company with a mission of ‘The End of Software.” Benioff has had a history of successful business ventures, including The Oracle Corporation and the Macintosh Division. However, he is noted for the achievement of designing a new philanthropic model. The Salesforce.com Foundation aims to inspire companies across the globe to give 1% of their resources to support charities and social causes. This 1%; 1%; 1% philanthropy model includes 1% of its company’s time, 1% of its equity, and 1% of its products be donated to charity. For Salesforce.com, this model means giving employees 6 paid days of volunteer time to use over the course of the year. To date, Salesforce.com employees have donated over 178,000 hours. Other companies like Google have embraced this model. The following tips can gain an individual toward greater personal philanthropy:

  1. Define your personal goals and values.
  2. Dedicate yourself to a cause that fulfills your life mission.
  3. Research an organization that contains the mission and vision that support your core beliefs.
  4. Meet with key decision-makers of the organization to find out how you can assist the organization (i.e., financial and personal time).
  5. Determine how you are going to ‘act out’ personal philanthropy in the organization.
  6. Set a date for implementing your personal philanthropy.
  7. Monitor and track results for future personal philanthropy.

With the holiday season before us, organizations need a company culture that is more than the status quo. Organizations that have a culture of unselfishness and concern for others will gain a competitive advantage. However, organizations need leaders who model the characteristics of personal philanthropy. The article showed how to grow personal philanthropy in today’s leaders. A philanthropist mindset can carry great rewards in sustaining meaningful programs in society. It is not exclusive only to the wealthiest people. Let’s pray it is not too late to produce in our future leaders.

© 2019 by Dr. Daryl D. Green

About Dr. Daryl Green:

Dr. Daryl Green provides consulting, guidance, and management training for today’s business leaders. He is the Dickinson Chair at Oklahoma Baptist University. In 2016, he retired as a Senior Engineer and Program Manager with the Department of Energy after a successful career. Dr. Green has over 25 years of management experience and has been noted and quoted by USA Today, Ebony Magazine, and Associated Press. For more information, please visit http://www.drdarylgreen.com.

Helping Today’s Universities Survive Market Changes and Provide Students with Better Experiences

Researchers, Dr. Daryl Green and Dr. George Taylor, share their insight at the 2019 Institute of Global Business Research Conference. 

How do today’s universities and colleges survive with rising educational cost, declining employments, and growing dissatisfaction among the US citizens?  Dr. Daryl D. Green and Dr. George Taylor III shared their solutions at the 2020 Institute for Global Business Research Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada. The Institute for Global Business Research (IGBR) is a non-profit organization, originated from many years of professional, academic teaching and research expertise of accomplished business professors from around the globe.

Due to numerous problems in higher education, universities are struggling for sustainable answers. Higher education is undergoing tremendous changes. Universities and colleges are being bombarded with disruptive change which has become fatal.  Enrollment in accredited colleges and universities have shrunk consistently since 2010 since the rising of online learning. According to Moody (2015), closure rate – out of 2,300 institutions – would triple by 2017, and the merger rate would double.  Dr. Clayton Christensen, renowned Harvard University professor, proclaimed “In 15 years from now half of US universities may be in bankruptcy.” Without making the necessary corrections, most academic institutions will not be able to survive. Dr. Green, conference presenter explains, “Small liberal arts colleges are the most susceptible to market forces.  Disruptive change has a dangerous consequence to traditional institutions. The results of disruptive change for organizations produces unpredictability and uncertainty of outcomes in the environments.” Dr. Green, Dr. Taylor, and Mrs. Violet Ford (John Hopkins University doctoral student) are developing a theoretical article, “Cultivating the Entrepreneurial Mindset in Today’s Small Liberal colleges & Universities” to discuss their initial findings with other scholars. Dr. Green and Dr. Taylor presented at the IGBR Conference.  Dr. Green is the Dickinson Chair and an Associate professor in the College of Business at Oklahoma Baptist University. He is a former US Department of Energy program manager with over 25 years of professional management experience. He is a nationally syndicated columnist, where he writes in the areas of leadership, decision-making, and culture. Dr. Green has a doctoral degree in Strategic Leadership from Regent University.

Dr. Taylor notes, “Traditional liberal arts colleges possess formal structure with identified roles and responsibilities.  Yet, the structure of many universities vary depending on their history, mission, and institutional type….Overall, there is a reliance on bureaucratic organizational structures; academic institutions, whether public or private,  incorporate key authority structures, including a governing board, a president or chancellor, a cohort of administrative leaders, and an academic senate.”  Dr. Taylor is an Assistant Professor in the School of Business at Tulsa Community College.  Previously, he served as a naval officer specializing in HR, and has over 25 years of leadership and management experience. His writings are in the areas of knowledge management, workplace spirituality, and employee engagement. Dr. Taylor has a doctoral degree in Organizational Leadership from the University of Phoenix and is 2019 EdD cohort learner attending Oklahoma University.  

In analyzing the current crises in higher education, their presentation describes a set of strategic implications that will aid universities planning to create sustainability education programs. In preparing today’s liberal arts university, administrators and senior executives of these institutions need to infuse an entrepreneurial mind-set in their faculty.  Here are their suggestions: (a)Leaders need to model the way in entrepreneurial mindset; (b)Be adaptable to changing market conditions; and (c) Universities must create entrepreneurial climates.  Dr. Green adds, “Cultivating an entrepreneurial mindset will infuse innovative thinking toward difficult problems and provide new revenue streams to universities that utilize student tuition as the principle income for these academic institutions.

To learn more about this research or to schedule media interviews with these researchers, please contact Dr. Green at drdarylgreen@gmail.com or 865-719-7239.

About AGSM LLC

AG Strategic Management Consulting (AGSM) is a start-up consulting firm focused on serving emerging and existing businesses in the areas of strategic planning, marketing, project management, and other administrative services. With a core staff of seasoned and nationally renowned professionals and a team approach to consulting projects, AGSM will offer exemplary services that meet the needs of its clients.

AGSM Consulting is also an intellectual property-based strategic consultancy which research and develops products includes books, e-books, articles, whitepapers, videos, podcasts, and other content medium to create new knowledge, training, and professional advisement

Dr. Daryl D. Green is an internationally acknowledged author and researcher.  He is the Vice President of AGSM LLC. He is also the Dickinson Chair at the Oklahoma Baptist University. Dr. Green writes a syndicated online column and blog. Moreover, he has been quoted in major media outlets, including USA Today, Associated Press, Ebony, and BET. In 2016, he retired from the federal government as a senior program manager. Dr. Green has spent more than 20 years helping organizations and thousands of individuals make good decisions through his lectures, seminars, and columns. 

OBU Business Presentation at ACBSP #6 Conference

IMG_9966

On October 4th,  Dr. John Cragin and Dr. Daryl Green shared their presentation, “Developing Entrepreneurs & Innovators in legacy institutions struggling with new market realities desperately clinging to the past” at the 2019 ACBSP Region #6 Conference at Oklahoma Baptist University, Shawnee, Oklahoma.  Dr. Cragin is a Professor of Social Entrepreneurship & International Business with extensive global experience.  Dr. Green, Dickinson Chair and Associate Professor, is a nationally recognized author and speaker.

IMG_9961

College Students Use Hip-Hop Culture to Break Down Gen Z Entrepreneurship

Recent academic research into entrepreneurship in Hip-Hop culture, which was conducted by students from the Paul Dickinson College of Business faculty at the Oklahoma Baptist University (OBU), has been published in the Management and Economics Research Journal; allowing students around the country to utilize the case study.

Although it is very rare for undergraduate research to be published, students from the Paul Dickinson College of Business at the Oklahoma Baptist University have done just that with their recent research paper, “Hip-Hop Culture: A Case Study of Beats by Dre For Entrepreneurship.” Published in the Management and Economics Research Journal, the paper examines how Record Producer Jimmy Lovine and hip-hop icon Dr. Dre were able to turn a small sub-culture into a global, multi-billion-dollar business. 

Focusing on the Beats by Dr. Dre headphone range, the students, alongside their professor Dr. Daryl D. Green, looked at how within a decade the company was able to control over 70% of the headphone market and make Dr. Dre the first “hip-hop billionaire.” The research paper observes how Beats by Dr. Dre used exceptional marketing techniques to target the millennial age group, including the use of celebrities alongside incorporating customizable headphones for each popular figure. 

In 2018, Students (L-R: JoziRose Mayfield, Sinai Gomez Farias, Braden Dwyer, & Cade Lauck) worked on a class assignment.

The student authors who contributed significantly to the research are Braden Dwyer, Sinai Gomez Farias (graduated), Cade Lauck, and JoziRose Mayfield. While faculty collaborating with students at an undergraduate level in business is rare, the OBU believes it is an important factor in helping to raise the next generation of scholar-practitioners. By involving students in their research, faculty become mentors to the students. Faculty collaborating with students at the undergraduate level in business is rare. 

Dean David Houghton, OBU business dean explains, “Faculty collaboration with students is important in raising the next generation of scholar-practitioners. By involving students in their research, faculty become more than educators. They become mentors. Sometimes, undergraduate students lack relevant professional experience, which can make it more difficult to involve them in research projects. But Dr. Green is great at finding products, services, and issues that are relevant to the students and for which they have a meaningful experience.” Yet, these undergraduates were a special kind of students.

OBU students get their research published in an academic publication (L-R: Dr. Daryl Green, JoziRose Mayfield, Braden Dwyer, & Cade Lauck).

At the time, these students turned a class assignment into relevant research to benefit others. OBU senior JoziRose Mayfield found the case study interesting: “The biggest and most important thing that I took away from this case study is analyzing the importance of demographics and product placement. Dr. Dre and his team did an exceptional job of choosing the right techniques when it comes to promoting their new brand. He made an effort to include celebrities in his product and incorporate customizable headphones for each popular figure.” Cade Lauck, a marketing major, agrees that getting their research published was a difficult process: “While working on this case study, I learned that teamwork was going to become extremely important. The communication that we had played a huge part in the coming together of the case study. I also learned a lot of information about how the communication and culture at Beats helped the company succeed.”

This collaborative research between faculty and students is significant because little research has been done in this area of Hip-Hop culture and entrepreneurship. (L-R: Dr. Daryl Green, JoziRose Mayfield, Braden Dwyer, & Cade Lauck).

Speaking on the publication, student Braden Dwyer said, “The research we conducted can be used to show students that having a creative idea isn’t enough to be successful. To be successful, as Dr. Dre has been with Beats, there must be a differentiator between you and the competitors in your market to truly stand out. Seeing our work published gave me a sense of purpose for our project. Rather than the case study just being turned in for a grade, people will be able to use our research and gain knowledge for themselves, which is a fantastic feeling.”

The results of this study are available online now, helping to assist today’s universities to infuse the entrepreneurial spirit in the next generation of business professionals. 

To view the paper, visit;

https://merj.scholasticahq.com/article/9564-hip-hop-culture-a-case-study-of-beats-by-dre-for-entrepreneurship, while for information about this research or if you would like assistance with your organization, please contact Dr. Daryl Green at 405-585-4414 (daryl.green@okbu.edu).

About Paul Dickinson College of Business

The Paul Dickinson College of Business is part of Oklahoma Baptist University. This qualified and Christian-based education is addressed to those who want to pursue a bachelor degree in business. The university provides the skills needed by the business graduates in contemporary professional careers as a leader. The business degree programs of the Oklahoma Baptist University are accredited and acknowledged by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs.

For more information on the Paul Dickinson College of Business at OBU, visit www.okbu.edu/business.

Research encourages universities to nourish entrepreneurial spirit in Generation Z

Speaking to a packed crowd at the 2019 ACBSP Conference, Dr. Daryl D. Green from the Oklahoma Baptist University, revealed that recent research shows Generation Z students are not only the most diverse and inclusive yet, but also the most ambitious. Making up nearly a quarter of the American population (some 74 million young adults), they shun the traditional employee route of their predecessors, with 72% of them wanting to start a business with 61% preferring to be an entrepreneur rather than an employee.

This high percentage reflects the differing work ethic of these students. Having never known a world without social media or smartphones, 84% of participants in a recent study by Forrester showed they regularly multitask with an internet-connected device when watching TV, whilst 66% believe technology makes anything possible. Not just digitally savvy, these students are driven to set themselves apart with nearly 50% participating in internships during high school for the purpose of advancing themselves professionally and 26% currently volunteering in their spare time. 

Therefore if Universities want to continue to attract the best students, it is important for them to adapt their teaching practices for Generation Z. Dr. Green broke this down into seven suggested practices;

  • Creating an academic environment that fosters creativity and entrepreneurial thinking
  • Setting clear expectations and boundaries
  • Engaging students digitally in the classroom and beyond
  • Breaking work assignments into smaller, manageable segments
  • Communicating regularly to provide frequent feedback
  • Being relevant and providing practical application and business role models
  • Incorporating a fluidic frequent reward system

Summing up, Dr. Green said “For the first time in history, there are now 5 generations coexisting in the work place and Generation Z, with its diversity and ingenuity, may be the best of all. This is why it is so important for universities and places of higher learning to encourage the natural entrepreneurial spirit of the most tech savvy, pragmatic and diverse generation yet; enabling them to join the workforce ready to hit the ground running and perhaps inspire businesses to adapt to the future.”  

Event Photos:

unnamed-6Caption #1:  Dr. Green presents “Wire for Life: Inspiring Generation Z to Be Entrepreneurial Leaders.”

unnamed-5Caption #2:  Dr. Green engages the audience of academics.

unnamed-4Caption #3:  Dr. Green unlocks the mystery related to GEN Z.

unnamed-3Caption #4:  Dr. Green discusses 5 generations in the workplaces.

unnamed-2Caption #5:  The audience listens as Dr. Green breaks down GEN Z traits.

unnamed-1Caption #6:  Dr. Green reunites with a former classmate from his doctoral program.

unnamedAbout Oklahoma Baptist University/Dr. Daryl D. Green: 

With its campus in Shawnee, and locations in Oklahoma City and Broken Arrow, OBU offers 10 bachelor’s degrees with 88 fields of study and 5 master’s degree programs. The Christian liberal arts university has an overall enrollment of 2,073, with students from 40 states and 35 other countries. OBU has been rated as one of the top 10 regional colleges in the West by the U.S. News and World Report for 25 consecutive years and has been Oklahoma’s highest rated regional college in the U.S. News rankings for 23 consecutive years. OBU is one of the three universities in Oklahoma and the only private Oklahoma University listed on Great Value College’s rankings of 50 Great Affordable Colleges in the Midwest. Forbes.com consistently ranks OBU as a top university in Oklahoma, and the Princeton Review has named OBU one of the best colleges and universities in the western United States for 12 consecutive years.

Dr. Daryl Green, assistant professor of business at Oklahoma Baptist University and Dickinson chair of business.  He is an award-winning author with more than 30 books. He and his wife Estraletta have several years of social and competitive ballroom dance experience, competing in Georgia, Louisiana, and Oklahoma. Dr. Green has taught social dancing classes and is a former president of the Knoxville Chapter of USA Dance Inc.  

Getting 5 Great Business Tips From A Real Father Figure

When I think about how far I have come from a boy growing up in Shreveport with humble beginnings to a retired manager from the Department of Energy with several national achievements, including books, I must thank my parents for raising me the ‘right way.’ I know my father, Edward Elias, left an immeasurable influence on my life. He was old school… hard, stern, and purposeful in making sure that his children did not land on the wrong side of life.

Several years ago, I spoke at my father’s funeral, and I could not hold back the tears. God had given me a great mentor to guide me through manhood; God was now taking him back. My dad had achieved so much despite his lack of formal education. He had set a standard for me… my measuring stick. I felt my father’s shoes were too large to fill; however, I could not hide from my responsibility. It was my turn. Would I falter under pressure? Passing the family’s collective experience to the next generation is a necessary part of building strong leadership within families. How can families preserve this rich knowledge base? Who is going to remind us of the old ways?

With that said, I’d like to share one special story about the power of a good father’s influence on  a boy’s business perspective. My father worked for the public library system in Shreveport for several decades, and he was faithful. The workers all called him ‘Elie.’ My father was also entrepreneurial. He had a lawn service on the side. In many cases, he would leave one full-time job to work a part-time job. He never complained. I now recognize that good parents sacrifice a lot for their children, even to their own detriment. In this discussion, I will share 5 business principles I learned from my own father.

When I was in junior high school, my father got me a job working for a wealthy family with a huge home. My father had several yards he was serving. I can remember him push, mowing large yards (1 acre) for $20. To me, that was cheap. He would perform a lot of work for small sums of money. Well, I started working for this family. I was a boy Friday. I worked all sorts of odd jobs outside, including cleaning out flower beds. It was really a lot of work and hard work. In the middle of the day, my father would visit me. The wife of the home would come outside and bring us water and prepare lunch for me… peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. I would thank her. I could tell that, inside, my father was laughing at me. I ate sandwiches.

My father knew I hated peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. Despite this fact, I ate those sandwiches and thanked the wife. I would work at least five hard hours. At the end of the day, the wealthy owner would come out and hand me $6. This wealthy man was extremely cheap. He thought he was doing me a favor by giving me an extra day (he was paying me a $1 per hour). However, I can remember that the minimum wage at the time was about $3.15. My father knew that this was crazy to work a teenager this hard for nothing. Yet, my father never said anything to me about this situation. The following are the lessons that I learned from my father:

  1. Always work hard, even when people are not watching you.
  2. Master a skill to the best of your abilities.
  3. Create a product or service of value and someone will always pay you for it.
  4. Always be respectful and polite to customers, even when you think you are being taken for granted.
  5. Always know your worth. People will often pay what you suggest. Make sure you are not underselling your value.

From working with my father, I learned some hard business lessons in life. In fact, that situation drove me to always get paid what you are worth in any job situation. I learned that I had to value my expertise and that some people would take advantage of you if you do not understand your value. That experience with the wealthy family taught me a lesson that I could never get at a business school or from a management expert. I learned this lesson from a hard knock.

unnamedMy father, in his own way, was grooming me for the decisions I would later have to make as a man. No! I know he never imagined that I would be an engineer. He would not have thought I would be an author of several books. He probably never envisioned as a business owner.  But—my father knew that I would need to have a basic understanding of life and how to manage as a man regardless of what happened to you. My father, Edward Elias, made a lasting impression on me as a man and a hard-working business owner. This business savvy will have a lasting impact on future entrepreneurs in our family. Knowledge is wasted if it isn’t used. I have always tried to pass on this simple wisdom of my father to everyone that I happened to meet. R.I.P my dear father!

© 2019 by D. D. Green

Please share your insight on this topic.