Posted by: nuleadership | January 25, 2016

Authentic Leadership in a Global Environment

dishonest -fingers cross-managers

Today’s employees expect managers to model corporate values. Sadly, some managers do not take this invisible code seriously.  Hypocrisy is the rule of the day. When I was sitting in my Sunday lecture, the instructor brought home what it meant to be hypocritical when discussing Jesus’ interaction with the leaders of his time, The Pharisees. Jesus openly criticized their actions to his followers in Matthew 23:2: “Therefore, whatever they [Pharisees] tell you to observe, that observe and do, but do not do their works. For they speak, but do nothing. They fasten heavy loads that are hard to carry and lay them on men’s shoulders, but they themselves will not move them with their finger.” Sadly, many workers face some less than genuine managers that fail to inspire them for greater performance.  In this post, we will examine the concept of authentic leadership in today’s society.

Competition is fierce across the globe. Managers are often forced to act genuine with their employees because financial circumstances force them to behave in ways that are in the best interest of shareholders and investors, not their employees.  Yet, organizations need talented and inspired employees who go beyond the basic requirements to excellence.  Yet, employees are reluctant to give this type of performance to self-serving leaders who do not care about them.

Forbes contributing writer Victor Lipman, in his article “The Foundational Importance of Trust in Management,” notes the alarming levels of distrust among workers.  According to a Gallup survey, 70% of workers are disengaged in the organization.  Lipman found several contributing factors to this problem, which were: disingenuous communication, lack of modeling behavior, and financial pressure.

Lipman explains, “As a manager myself, I recognized it was critical for my employees to trust me if I expected them to be fully productive on my watch.”  With trust on the downturn with numerous layoffs and higher unemployment, managers must be sincere and genuine with their workforce if they want a different type of performance.

Organizations must foster authentic leadership in today’s environment. Leadership denotes the ability to influence others.  When the adjective of authentic is modified on the word, something special emerges.  The adjective authentic conveys “something that is real or genuine and not counterfeit.”  In the case of the Pharisees, they were influencers of their followers.  However, the reality of the matter was that their type of leadership was not genuine or sincere. Authentic leadership defines the leader’s ability to have honest relationships with followers through transparent relationships.  In this mode, the leader may leave himself/herself vulnerable to others.

Bill George, author of Authentic Leadership, describes authentic leadership as ‘a leadership style that is consistent with a leader’s personality and core values, and that is honest, ethical and practical.’ Dr. Richard Daft, author of Management, further outlines the following key characteristics of authentic leadership: (a) Authentic leaders pursue their purpose with passion; (b) Authentic leaders practice solid values; (c) Authentic leaders lead with their hearts as well as their heads; (d) Authentic leaders establish connected relationships; and Authentic leaders demonstrate self-discipline. With these traits, authentic leadership would be synonymous with an unselfish leadership approach.

Important Video

In closing, today’s workers want managers who can inspire them for higher performance. However, workers are not looking for managers who are not genuine in their relationships with them. We examined the concept of authentic leadership in today’s society. The analysis demonstrated that workers want leaders who are authentic and sincere with them.

With the many disruptive forces surrounding the workplace, like layoffs, employees want to believe their management is looking out for the worker’s best interest.  If authentic leadership is applied, organizations will be better able to foster this value.  By utilizing authentic leadership in their organizations, managers will be better able to build these types of positive relationships with workers.

How you deal with a hypocritical manager in the workplace and what can be done to created more authentic leaders? Please use your professional and personal experiences on the topic.

© 2016 by Daryl D. Green

References:

Authentic Leadership by Bill George

Management by Richard Daft

“The Foundational importance of Trust in Management” by Victor Lipman

 

 

 

 

Mariah Carey

Helen was a highly successful career woman. Her star shined bright in her corporation. Yet, in spite of these corporate accomplishments, Helen had no meaningful relationships. Her husband was distanced due to Helen’s businesslike approaches to her. Helen’s three children resent her because she was emotional absent in their lives. On the dark days when Helen was alone and uninterrupted, she longed for more meaningful relationships.

During a Christmas banquet, Pastor Nathan Wilson was the keynote speaker and led a lively topic on All I Want for Christmas Is You. In his speech, Pastor Wilson harked on the true meaning of Christmas as the birth of Jesus Christmas instead of the commercialization of the holidays.

Of course, this title is a famous song sung by pop diva Mariah Carey. Some thought provoking lyrics are:

“I don’t want a lot for Christmas
There is just one thing I need
I don’t care about the presents
Underneath the Christmas tree
I just want you for my own
More than you could ever know
Make my wish come true oh
All I want for Christmas is you”

As another Christmas season has come and gone, many people assess whether the holidays were successful based on whether they got what they wanted. According to Worldatlas.com, Americans planned on spending around $830 on average in 2015 for various Christmas-related purposes (15% increase from 2014).

One in five Americans intended to spend between $500 and $999. With the slick advertisements, businesses convince the general public that their relationships will be enhanced by buying certain products/services for their loved ones.

Thus, there is a mad dash to acquire things in the hopes of making others happy.  In fact, there is an understanding that the gifts are what the receiver really wants.  Some people would argue that that’s the nature of children. However, when these actions are not of children but adults, society has created a society with empty relationships.

Adam Grant, author of Give and Take, argues that people give to the degree that they will receive something of equal measure.  He observes, “Takers have a distinctive signature: they like to get more than they give. They tilt reciprocity in their own favor, putting their own interests ahead of other’s needs.”

Good relationships take quality time and effort. Building any meaningful relationships means the relationship needs to be based on substance and not superfluous elements.  There is no universal definition for a good relationship. Yet, there are some common attributes of good relationships.

A good relationship is defined as the way that two or more people deal with each other based on the foundation of mutual trust, respect, and personal concern. When a person truly cares about an individual, the quality of life is enhanced.

However, good relationships take effort on everyone’s parts. Some people are caught in the past with experiencing negative relationships. Given that scenario, past relationships hold these people captive. Biblically speaking, this wisdom (I Peter 4:8) comes through: “Above all, love each other deeply, because love covers over a multitude of sins.” 

Good relationships are not one-sided.  In fact, good working relationships are authentic in nature. For example, a boss demonstrates his concern about his employees when they are having personal issues outside of work. This boss understands that employees want to be treated individually.

By taking these actions, the boss is building good relationships with his workers. Gareth Jones and Jennifer George, author of Contemporary Management, note, “Relationship-oriented leaders are primarily concerned with developing good relationships with their subordinates and being liked by them.”   Thus, relationships in general, are not static, but can change over time due to several variables including time and distance.  The following questions help jump start good relationships:

  • Are you frustrated enough to change your past behavior so that you can move in a positive direction?
  • Do you set unrealistic expectations of other people in your relationships?
  • Have you invested enough energy in your relationships to make them meaningful?
  • Are you still trying to change others to meet your needs instead of allowing people to be themselves?
  • Have you forgiven others in order to let go of the negative elements of past relationships?
  • Are you willing to get help from professionals such counselors who can help you?

Good relationships go beyond the receiving of things. Without good relationships, happiness will be far away. After the Christmas holidays are over, some people will be left feeling bitter because they didn’t get what they wanted. Yet, one of the best gifts that one can have is a meaningful, authentic relationship that lasts a long time.  However, the demands of any good relationship can make a person vulnerable.

Caroline Zwickerson, author of 9 Qualities of People Who Are Great At Relationships, discussed the cost of working relationships:  “When we are vulnerable, we allow another person to see us and peek into our soul. This fosters a sense of trust that cannot be reached with a thousand words.” Don’t wait any longer for building good relationships. Start today to build a great life, not a wasted one.

(c) 2016 by Dr. Daryl D. Green

Posted by: nuleadership | November 26, 2015

Showing a Spirit of Gratitude

Has our society forgotten how to be appreciative?  Many people are too busy running the rat race to say, “Thank you.”  I remember sitting in a Sunday school class of young students during my college experience at Southern University.  One student was saying how ungrateful he had been toward his parents.  I also felt guilty.  My parents bought me my first car while I was in high school; most students did not have cars.  I had envisioned receiving a brand new car.  Well, I did not.

I got an old 1973 Dodge Charger.  I was disappointed.  But, I ended up falling in love with that old car which I later called “The New Wave Cruisemobile.”  My car was far more dependable than most automobiles.  I remember never having said “Thank you” for my car – I had also taken my parents for granted.  Our society does not teach us that being appreciative is a virtue.  We will examines the importance of developing a spirit of gratitude as a competitive advantage toward employability.

Developing a spirit of gratitude separates an individual from the rest of the pack.  This attribute is all about character.  Gratitude can be defined as the quality of being thankful; it is a readiness to show appreciation for and to return kindness.  In the fast pace of industrial living, people are not saying “Thank you” to anyone.  Most people feel they deserve any kind act done for them.  In fact, a selfish society creates a generation of ungrateful children.

Consequently, our children grow up with this huge expectation of social pampering.  Why else would a) waiters expect tips without good service, b) students expect good grades without putting in the effort, and c) couples want great relationships without any communication.  All of these unrealistic expectations make “Thank you” less important.

It is easy to see how people such as recent college graduates, can be discouraged with the current economic recession.  According to the U.S. Labor Department, only 47.6% of people aged 16 to 24 had jobs last August.  In the current economic climate, individuals need a spirit of gratitude for a competitive advantage.  Some young people may call this strategy too old-fashioned.  Yet, fools shun wise counsel.

Thus, when you show someone some gratitude after they assist you, that individual will likely continue to help or do more for you.  However, if you are ungrateful, many times people will not do any more for you.  Here are some things you can do to help produce this act of kindness: 

  • Count your blessings one by one. Give God thanks.
  • Tell your parents “Thank you” for their support.
  • Give back financially to your university.
  • Visit past teachers who have contributed to your good character.
  • Support high school and college alumni organizations.
  • Send your church Sunday school teacher a greeting card.
  • Thank the person in your community who serves as your role model.
  • Thank the public servants in your area (such as garbage collectors, police officers, postal workers, fire fighters, etc.).
  • Recognize and praise past coaches who have helped you.
  • Say something positive to your minister who contributes to your spiritual growth.

Finally, we live in a world of takers.  The holiday season is the perfect time to add some gratitude into the character-building process.  If a person is honest, he or she can probably think of at least one person who has helped him or her in some way.  It is easy to get into a trap of only looking at the negative side of life. Showcasing a spirit of gratitude can be very rewarding and can transform an individual’s situation.

 © 2015 by Daryl D. Green

Posted by: nuleadership | September 7, 2015

The Great Global Talent Search: Retooling for Greater Employability

sustainability-boy-worldI watch and listen. Industry leader Yasir Abulrahman was sharing with my undergraduate class an overview of cross-cultural interests as they related to operating a business in the Middle East. Yasir, who has Middle Eastern roots himself, explained how some U.S. managers went abroad on work assignments without understanding cultural sensitivity.

Sadly, these managers underestimated the problems associated with continental differences.  Yet, most companies cannot afford to make these international debacles.  Can you? This article examines how individuals can position themselves with greater employability by acquiring the necessary global competencies for the future.

Globalization is a reality that’s not going away. Having the right management strategy can elevate a country’s financial well-being. India and China flex their mighty muscle due to the dominance of their outsourcing efforts. Thus, globalization provides a disruptive change to established paradigms.

The National Intelligence Council’s Global Trends Report has been monitoring global trends across two decades. In the Global Trends 2030: Alternative Worlds report, the study outlines the global landscape ahead for millions of unsuspecting international participants. For example, individual employment will accelerate due to poverty reduction, growth of the global middle class, greater educational attainment, widespread use of new communications and manufacturing technologies, and health-care advances.

Yet, power will shift to networks and alliances in a multipolar world. The U.S., European, and Japanese share of global income is projected to fall from 56% today to well under 50% by 2030. Asia will have surpassed North America and Europe in global power; China will probably have the largest economy.

Countries coming into prominent include India, Brazil, Columbia, Indonesia, Nigeria, South Africa, and Turkey. Leadership consultants Ernest Gundling, Karen Cvitkovich, and Terry Hogan understand the challenges faced by organizations attempting to go global:  “…the years ahead will most probably bring discontinuous events that cannot be accurately predicted based strictly upon extrapolations from the present, as with unanticipated and transformative events of recent years such as armed conflicts, terrorism, financial crises, piracy, epidemics, and environmental disasters precipitated by either natural or human causes.”

Going global is not an easy process. Countries attempt to invest more into their education system in order to better manage their own talent management system. Countries seek to find strategic gaps. For example, foreign countries now hold more than $12 trillion in U.S. assets, including stocks, bonds, real estate, and more financial elements. In fact, Japan and China are very motivated to support the American dollar so that Americans will continue to buy their goods, thus keeping their citizens working. However, some executives feel that going global is the same as domestic business. It isn’t. In the 2012 Quarterly McKinley report, author Pankaj Ghemawat pointed out the weaknesses of global competency for business.

According to a research study of senior executives, 76% believe their organizations needed to develop global leadership capabilities; yet, only 7% of them thought they were currently being effective. At a low scale, companies attempt to search for this talent with a lens of also attracting more cheap labor.

In fact, multinational businesses search the world for the best talent to fill their vacancies; some executives hope they can find the next Steve Jobs of Apple. Therefore, professionals need to equip themselves with the necessary skills to be marketable in a global environment. American companies realize they can ensure future profitability by marketing products and services abroad.

Global competencies will better secure the future for many.  Thirty percent of U.S. companies acknowledged that they had failed to exploit their international business opportunities fully due to insufficient internationally competent staff. Peter Cappelli, author of Why Good People Can’t Get Jobs, explains that even with over 23 million people unemployed, companies argue they cannot find qualified workers.

Cappelli further notes that employers are looking for specific talent.  Moreover, Marshall Goldsmith, Cathy Greenberg, Alastair Robertson, and Maya Hu-Chan, author of Global Leadership: The Next Generation, utilized a 2-year accenture study of over 200 global organizations to produce a general framework for global leadership. The five global competencies included global thinking, appreciation of diversity, technological savvy, a willingness to partner and an openness to sharing leadership. In the past, CEOs did not consider the importance of global leadership competencies. The reality of globalization has changed this mindset. In order to build these necessary competencies, the following strategies are provided:

  • Obtain global awareness (i.e., daily environmental scanning).
  • Become fluent in a foreign language.
  • Seek coaching and/or mentoring with global leaders.
  • Participate in study abroad programs or find cultural immersion opportunities.
  • Search for international job assignments.
  • Take global leadership/global management at a local university.
  • Participate in diversity training in your local community.
  • Treat individuals fairly and with respect.
  • Seek ways to work with a diverse team/organization.
  • Conduct research, writings and publications on global issues.

Uncertainties and high risks will continue to plague businesses that seek to conduct business abroad. As the article has demonstrated, executives are in a quagmire due to the lack of sufficient international experience among current employees. Management Strategist C.K. Prahalad notes, “This world is one beset with ambiguity and stress. Facts, emotions, anxieties, power and dependence, competition and collaboration, individual and team efforts are all present…Managers have to deal with these often conflicting demands simultaneously.”

Rather than panic, employees and the unemployed should view international turbulence as unfiltered, innovative opportunities. Therefore, individuals who are prepared can position themselves with greater employability by acquiring the necessary global competencies for the future.

© 2015 by Daryl D. Green

Posted by: nuleadership | April 13, 2015

Valuing Servant-hood for Today’s Leaders

handshakes-business

When I was growing up, my mother was the youth director of our church.  In elementary school, there are pressures about being cool.  I was an active church member (and yes, a choir boy in the literal sense).

My mother expected her children to be the model young person, which involved participating in church required activities.  For me, that meant participating in morning worship where the youth were required to lead devotion periodically. A call for volunteers would go out to the youth.  Of course, most of my peers felt comfortable rejecting those requests to participate.

Sadly, I was expected to accept these requests.  My mother told us (her children), “If no one else participates, I expect my children to (lead devotion) because I’m the youth director.”  I was forced (obligated) to participate because of my relationship to my mother and a direct request from any youth advisor.

In doing these volunteer services out of obligation, I had an internal resentment about participating in church functions as a youth that carried on for several years later in life.  As a more mature adult, who is a church leader, I now participate in church activities because I have a love and passion for serving others. Likewise, many managers interact with their employees out of a sense of obligation and not due to their internal desire of helping others.  This article examines the value of servant-hood in today’s organizations.

Employees want leaders that care about them and their well-being as individuals.  In the book, The Speed of Trust, Stephen Covey discusses the competitive advantage of having trust in organizations: “The ability to establish, extend, and restore trust with all stakeholders – customers, business partners, investors and coworkers – is the key leadership competency of the new, global economy.”

A Watson Wyatt study indicated in high-trust organizations there is almost three times higher return than in low-trust organizations for shareholders.  However, one study noted that only 51% of employees have trust and confidence in senior management. Some of the reasons that workers are so cynical and apathetic of today’s leaders is the lack of personal interest of managers in their workers’ welfare.  Most managers are self-absorbed in getting ahead and doing things that are in their own self-interest. Unfortunately, some people do not want to subscribe to servant leadership.

In order to climb the corporate leader, some individuals become ruthless and take advantage of others. Not every manager wants to be a giver, and many would rather take from others.  Dr. Richard Daft, the author of Management, argues the importance of knowing your own personal motivations: “…the first requirement for being a good manager, is understanding oneself.  Managers’ characteristics and behavior can profoundly affect the workplace and influence employee motivation, morale, and job performance.”

Dr. Draft went on to explain that when managers operate from a higher level of development by focusing on the needs of followers and empowering workers to be successful that these managers are exercising a form of servant leadership.

Many leaders operate under a sense of servitude.  Servitude relates to the obligation required due to the position and other. Yet, servitude speaks to a forced behavior that is filled with negative connotations such a bondage and involuntary labor.  On the contrary, servanthood involves an internal willingness to help others out of choice and voluntary commitment.

Kenneth Haugk, author of Christian Caregiving: A Way of Life, argues that servanthood has more positive benefits when dealing with human beings: “At best, the person snared by servitude acts out of a sense of duty and fear, but the person living in servanthood acts out of a sense of commitment and love.”

When there is an obligation rather than an internal compass when making decisions involving others, an individual may be captured with the internal instinct of doing what’s in their own best interest.  The outcome can be negative to the organization.  For example, a new manager is in charge of a new organization.  Instead of getting to know his new employee, the manager starts hiring people from the outside to fill positions internally. Morale tumbles. Trust is lost, and the opportunity is blown for this manager to build healthy relationships. 

On the contrary, servanthood is about meeting the needs of others.  The concept is very foreign to a society fuelled by selfishness.  Servanthood injects into leaders a strong desire to serve and work for the benefit of others. Gareth Jones and Jennifer George, authors of Contemporary Management, explain the merits of leaders serving their followers.

They explain, “When leaders empower their subordinates, the subordinates typically take over some of the responsibilities that used to reside with the leader or manager….Empowerment increases a manager’s ability to get things done because the manager has the support and help of subordinates who have special knowledge of the work tasks.”

Employees want leaders who are looking out for their self-interest. For example, a senior manager must downsize her workforce in order to be competitive. She seeks to empathize with the downsized employees and opts to inform them early and personally, talking with each affected employee about their circumstances; she leveraged her network and got all of the affected employees job offers from other companies.

The employees’ situation did not change due to the manager’s behavior. However, their perception of that manager and organization changed.  Servanthood is a much better attribute than servitude given the cynicism about today’s employees.

Finally, managers need to change what they are doing if organizations want to achieve higher performance. Doing things in the best interest of their employees is a good start. Yet, leaders must begin by digging deep within themselves to discover a servant-oriented character.

This article examined the value of servant-hood in today’s organizations in order to provide a competitive advantage. Most managers are indifferent to their workers.  With servanthood, leaders can rewrite the organizational direction and instill a teamwork attitude.  Pray that it’s not too late.

© 2015 by Daryl D. Green

 

Posted by: nuleadership | March 9, 2015

The Great Global Talent Search

sustainability-boy-world

Globalization is a reality that’s not going away. Having the right management strategy can elevate a country’s financial well-being. India and China flex their mighty muscle due to the dominance of their outsourcing efforts. Thus, globalization provides a disruptive change to established paradigms. The National Intelligence Council’s Global Trends Report has been monitoring global trends across two decades.

In the Global Trends 2030: Alternative Worlds report, the study outlines the global landscape ahead for millions of unsuspecting international participants. For example, individual employment will accelerate due to poverty reduction, growth of the global middle class, greater educational attainment, widespread use of new communications and manufacturing technologies, and health-care advances.

Yet, power will shift to networks and alliances in a multipolar world. The U.S., European, and Japanese share of global income is projected to fall from 56% today to well under 50% by 2030. Asia will have surpassed North America and Europe in global power; China will probably have the largest economy.

Countries coming into prominent include India, Brazil, Columbia, Indonesia, Nigeria, South Africa, and Turkey. Leadership consultants Ernest Gundling, Karen Cvitkovich, and Terry Hogan understand the challenges faced by organizations attempting to go global:  “…the years ahead will most probably bring discontinuous events that cannot be accurately predicted based strictly upon extrapolations from the present, as with unanticipated and transformative events of recent years such as armed conflicts, terrorism, financial crises, piracy, epidemics, and environmental disasters precipitated by either natural or human causes.”

Going global is not an easy process. Countries attempt to invest more into their education system in order to better manage their own talent management system. Countries seek to find strategic gaps. For example, foreign countries now hold more than $12 trillion in U.S. assets, including stocks, bonds, real estate, and more financial elements. In fact, Japan and China are very motivated to support the American dollar so that Americans will continue to buy their goods, thus keeping their citizens working. However, some executives feel that going global is the same as domestic business. It isn’t.

In the 2012 Quarterly McKinley report, author Pankaj Ghemawat pointed out the weaknesses of global competency for business. According to a research study of senior executives, 76% believe their organizations needed to develop global leadership capabilities; yet, only 7% of them thought they were currently being effective. At a low scale, companies attempt to search for this talent with a lens of also attracting more cheap labor.

In fact, multinational businesses search the world for the best talent to fill their vacancies; some executives hope they can find the next Steve Jobs of Apple. Therefore, professionals need to equip themselves with the necessary skills to be marketable in a global environment. American companies realize they can ensure future profitability by marketing products and services abroad.

Global competencies will better secure the future for many.  Thirty percent of U.S. companies acknowledged that they had failed to exploit their international business opportunities fully due to insufficient internationally competent staff. Peter Cappelli, author of Why Good People Can’t Get Jobs, explains that even with over 23 million people unemployed, companies argue they cannot find qualified workers. Cappelli further notes that employers are looking for specific talent.

Moreover, Marshall Goldsmith, Cathy Greenberg, Alastair Robertson, and Maya Hu-Chan, author of Global Leadership: The Next Generation, utilized a 2-year accenture study of over 200 global organizations to produce a general framework for global leadership. The five global competencies included global thinking, appreciation of diversity, technological savvy, a willingness to partner and an openness to sharing leadership. In the past, CEOs did not consider the importance of global leadership competencies. The reality of globalization has changed this mindset. In order to build these necessary competencies, the following strategies are provided:

  • Obtain global awareness (i.e., daily environmental scanning).
  • Become fluent in a foreign language.
  • Seek coaching and/or mentoring with global leaders.
  • Participate in study abroad programs or find cultural immersion opportunities.
  • Search for international job assignments.
  • Take global leadership/global management at a local university.
  • Participate in diversity training in your local community.
  • Treat individuals fairly and with respect.
  • Seek ways to work with a diverse team/organization.
  • Conduct research, writings and publications on global issues.

Uncertainties and high risks will continue to plague businesses that seek to conduct business abroad. As the article has demonstrated, executives are in a quagmire due to the lack of sufficient international experience among current employees. Management Strategist C.K. Prahalad notes, “This world is one beset with ambiguity and stress.…Managers have to deal with these often conflicting demands simultaneously.” Rather than panic, employees and the unemployed should view international turbulence as unfiltered, innovative opportunities. Therefore, individuals who are prepared can position themselves with greater employability by acquiring the necessary global competencies for the future.

© 2015 by Daryl D. Green

 

Posted by: nuleadership | January 5, 2015

Working Professionals Need Goalsetting for Their Families Too

 baby-boomers-finances-050212

In these difficult economic times, more and more working professionals are forced to spend time away from their families. Other professionals are advancing their personal agendas in hopes of getting to the top of their profession. This blog discussion examines how working professionals can implement goal setting for their own families despite their hectic schedules.

Like many professionals caught up in my work life and work family, individuals often do not take the time to use these proven principles in their own homes. Many couples are more selfish than their children are and don’t provide a healthy, nurturing environment for them.  This reality speaks to the personal ambition and priorities of the individual within a family structure.  Writer J.A. Littler speaks to the material motives and priorities of our society: “Everyone worships something.

While there may be no official religions or cults devoted to cars, money, fashion, or music, these pleasures of life and facets of society are all too often the overwhelming focus of people’s time, energy, and emotions.”  Our society tells them they can have it all—money, power, and fame without any sacrifices.

Sadly, many working professionals provide their children a great standard of life; however, these parents are often setting their children up for failure.  Many times the results of their labor are children who feel entitled and materialistic. The truth is something is being sacrificed in lieu of a successful career…your family. The following strategy is provided:

  1. Evaluate your family situation based on how family members’ priorities are spending most of their current time (i.e. work, community activities).
  2. Establish the desired vision for your family (the ideal family model).
  3. Develop priorities for the family in which all family members will comply.
  4. Create a family mission statement.
  5. Develop family goals each year from a holistic viewpoint (family, career, spiritual life, finances, etc.).
  6. Monitor results based on the desired family vision.

Families are the foundation for thriving civilizations, and strong communities are built by strong marriages. Consequently, working professionals need to challenge themselves to provide a more holistic approach for their lives. In this discussion, we evaluated how working professionals can implement goal setting for their own families.

Often, this reality is about balancing competing priorities. Les Brown, author of How to Become the Person You Always Wanted to Be-No Matter What the Obstacle, notes, “Your values are not set by government or church leaders. Your values give you consistency in the way you approach life…By holding to your beliefs, you can always stay on track toward your dreams.”  Hopefully, working professionals can make these life changes for their families before it is too late.

Please feel free to share your insight on this subject.

© 2015 by Daryl D. Green

Posted by: nuleadership | October 20, 2014

Rethinking Caregiving Strategies for Today’s Organizations

globe-hands-mini

There is an increasing need for individuals to provide caregiving services.  Social changes, such as financial crises, growing unemployment, job loss, homelessness, family break-ups, relationship issues, and other problematic concerns, place huge demands on government and community-based support services.

Pastor Richard S. Brown, a community advocate in Tennessee, talks about the pressing need of churches and other service organizations that are reaching out to the needs of people:  “Everyone at one time or another will face giants in life. Giants represent those insurmountable problems, challenges, and obstacles in life.”

Often times, these giants of life cannot be solved without direct intervention from others.  For example, the aging population is a growing problem for organizations providing caregiving services.  According to the U.S. Census, 13% of the population is over 65 years old.  The average life expectancy is 77 years. Women live longer than men.  Seniors over 85 years old are the fastest growing segment of the population. Seventy five percent of people over 65 have one or more chronic health conditions.

Today’s organizations need to rethink the concept of caregiving in today’s society.  First Lady Rosalynn Carter noted the importance of caregiving: “There are four kinds of people in this world: those who have been caregivers, those who are currently caregivers, those who will be caregivers, and those who will need caregivers.” A caregiver can be defined as ‘anyone who provides assistance to someone who is incapacitated and needs help.

Caregiving can be performed informally via unpaid (family members and friends) or formally (volunteer or paid caregivers associated with a service system).  Currently, there are over 50 million caregivers.  By 2020, caregivers will number 80 million.  If one was to profile the typical caregiver, it would be described as the following: female (75%), over 50 years old (51%), sole provider (37%), and a relative (i.e. adult children- 57%).

Many organizations seek to address caregiving with generic solutions for their constituents instead of applying holistic approach to the specific person.  The generic approach is faster and cheaper in many cases.  However, Dr. Kenneth Haugh, author of Christian Caregiving: A Way of Life, argues the importance of understanding the needs of those individuals you are serving. Dr. Haugh observes, “Treating people as objects, as territory to be gained, is not only bad manners, but also completely fails to meet their unique needs and to respect their spiritual dignity before God.”

Organizations should value the welfare of the caregiver.  Many people who provide care to others are overworked, stressed out, and on the verge of quitting.  However, the organization that they are serving does not see this taking place.  Some organizations treat their caregivers like objects.  Caregivers suffer a variety of problems associated with caregiving.

In fact, caregivers have higher levels of stress, depression, fatigue, burnout, and lower levels of well-being and physical health.  Furthermore, 49% of females and 31% of males experience depression as a result of caregiving.

High performing organizations understand that they must continuously re-assess their processes in order to sustain success.  Yet, many nonprofit organizations and community-based organizations like churches that serve society forget about the mental and physical welfare of their caregivers in offering needed services to the area.

Here are some methods to use: (a) communicate the objectives of your organization and the desired outcomes, (b) train the caregivers so that they deal holistically with clients, (c) determine what the caregivers needs in order to perform an outstanding job and sustain this performance, (d) look for creative ways to prevent caregiver burnout and fatigue, and (f) provide an mechanism where caregivers and clients can provide feedback on continuous improvement in the caregiving area.

The pressures of life will continue to be problems for many people.  Some individuals cannot overcome these giants in life without interventions.  Caregivers play a critical role in assisting people in solving their problems.  However, today’s organizations cannot continue to take caregivers for granted.  Many caregivers are stressed out and underpaid; perhaps even on the verge of giving up their jobs in caregiving.

Therefore, this article maintains that today’s organizations must rethink their strategies for administering caregiving in the near future. Organizations that can make the necessary changes will be better prepared to sustain future success.

© 2014 by Daryl D. Green

Posted by: nuleadership | August 23, 2014

Better Decision Making for a Better Life

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Have you ever wondered why some people continue to make bad decisions? You see million-dollar celebrities doing it. You can see this action in government officials and business leaders. There are no discriminators. From the very rich to the poorest of the poor, we see people caught in a vicious cycle of bad decision making. Sadly, we see it much closer than that. We witness relatives making those bad decisions. Despite all the wise counsel, the poor decisions continue.

 Why is it important to teach people how to make better decisions? Anthony Robbins, author of Awakening the Giant Within, attributes good decision-making as a key attribute to a happy life. Bestselling author Brian Tracy argues, “The further you think into the future, the better decisions you will make in the present to assure that future becomes a reality.” Making better decisions improves the quality of one’s life.

 

As a young advisor and college professor, I constantly hear students proclaim, “I’m grown.” This statement implies I don’t have to listen to anyone. I know best. Therefore, I can make my own decisions. Through series after series of bad decisions, the youth continues on merry ride of worsening consequences. Two things generally can stop this dead-end trap.

One lies in becoming more mature with age, and the other is experience. In going through a series of bad decisions, a wise person gains insight on the consequences of a bad decision. Every person, regardless of their background or social standing, can benefit from good decision-making techniques. Here are some methods to use: (a) define the problem or issues, (b) conduct research on the matter, (c) discuss with respected individuals with similar circumstances, (d) consider at least two alternatives, (e) select best decisions, based on your value system, and (f) move on and accept any consequences.

Making the right decision is a difficult process. No one will usually applaud your many good decisions; however, you will probably catch heat over the bad ones. Les Brown, author of How to Become the Person You Always Wanted to Be-No Matter What the Obstacle, explains, “Your values are not set by government or church leaders. Your values give you consistency in the way you approach life…By holding to your beliefs, you can always stay on track toward your dreams.”  By making better decisions, individuals can look forward to a better quality of live.

 

© 2014 by Daryl D. Green

 

Posted by: nuleadership | June 2, 2014

2014 College Grads & Beyond: Revising Your Job Strategy

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Many parents will celebrate their child’s graduation from college this year.  However, most parents are concerned that their children will not have a better life than they did.  According to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the U.S. ranked fourth worst among 29 developed countries for children obtaining a higher level of education than their parents.  In fact, only 22% of those 24 to 34 years old achieved a higher level of education than their parents in the United States compared to an OECD average of 37%.

For many former college graduates, unemployment and underemployment continue to be a curse on their dreams and aspirations.  Yet, this pressing problem has impacted many segments of our society and way of life.  For example, adult children are returning home to their parents at record numbers. Sadly, overly-protective parents may stunt the maturation of their college graduates by destroying their independence as they return home.

These miscues in understanding the financial climate and the hiring process of employers could jeopardize their future.  This article examines the current economic crisis and how recent college graduates and parents can better position themselves for more employment opportunities.

According to several polls, including Harris and Career Builders’ polls, employers expect to hire more college graduates based on feedback from more than 2,000 hiring managers and human resource professionals from various industries.  In fact, 57% of employers plan to hire new college graduates which are up from last year (53%).   Businesses and other organizations intend to hire graduates in percentages from these majors:  computer/information (28%), engineering (18%), math/statistics (14%), health/clinical services (14%), communications technology (12%), engineering technologies (11%), liberal areas (10%), education (7%), science technologies (7%), and communications/journalism (7%).

Consequently, in society, getting hired can be shown as the important effect on the demand for any particular college major.   If there is no demand or interest for college major, students will have a difficult time in finding gainful employment.

Despite this positive prospect, many employers feel that most college graduates are not prepared for the workforce.  According to a recent study, 24% of employers do not feel that recent graduates are prepared for positions in their companies.  Sadly, employers do not have the time and patience to groom prospective graduates who are talented but lack experience or preparation for the workforce.  Companies want prospective employees who are ready to work.

Peter Cappelli, author of Why Good People Can’t Get Jobs, explains that employers have shifted their expectations for prospective employees: “Employers do not have time to develop the new skills they need internally when dramatic changes in products and strategies happen so quickly.”  Regardless of where you stand on today’s college students, it is clear that some intervention is necessary if they are to be successful in this environment.  The following job strategies are offered to better assist this segment of the population:

  • Evaluate your current online appearance so that your image makes a positive impression.
  • Get an independent assessment on your resume and job strategies.
  • Develop a personal brand that will create an image of indispensability and uniqueness.
  • Showcase your expertise on a variety of levels (blogs, media expert, etc.).
  • Champion a significant cause in a nonprofit organization such as United Way.
  • Consider volunteering in areas where you can build or enhance your expertise.
  • Extend your network globally with social media platforms such as Linkedin.com.
  • Obtain special training or certifications to become more competitive.

With the ever increasing competition for limited job opportunities, college grads must understand today’s hiring process. Additionally, parents can assist their recent grad by providing other non-traditional strategies for obtaining full employment.  This article demonstrates the need for careful and deliberate job strategies in today’s competitive environment for employability.

Individuals can help themselves by becoming knowledgeable in all aspects of the employment process.  The road may not be easy, but dedicated planning will pay off for recent college grads and their parents to find successful employment in the future.

© 2014 by Daryl D. Green

 

 

[1] “U.S. students struggle to top their parents” by Leslie Kwoh

[2] Talent on Demand by Peter Cappelli

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