Humility in Leadership: The MIT Principle

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I just sat and listened. Bob, the director, talks about how the universities wanted to give back to the society. In fact, this prestigious university opened its doors to young engineering students who were a part of the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE). Faculty and staff were all communicating that the impossible was possible. The place was the highly regarded Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Lincoln Laboratory. Everyone goes by their first names, doctorate or not. Egos are checked at the door (well everyone is brilliant).

One MIT staff member explains this reality, “Everyone here is smart.” If someone comes in cocky, there is someone who is smarter than him in another area. That keeps people ‘in check’. I was a little stunned. I had imagined an MIT culture where innovative mavericks were left to their own devices independent of others to produce incredible solutions for society. Yet, sharing, service, and working together appeared to carry a lot of weigh on campus.

Many people feel that leadership is about being the brightest and sharpest ‘cat on the block.’ At times, I have worked with some of the most brilliant people in the world, having federal oversight of two national laboratories in my career. This article examines the concepts of humility in today’s leaders. Additionally, the MIT Principle is developed so that all leaders understand that even high achievers need a sense of humility to work in high performing organization.

mit-logo

Even brilliant students at MIT need humility in order to be successful on campus. The MIT Principle, as I dubbed, can be an important lesson to learn. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a special place filled with innovators and overachievers. MIT is a private institution which was founded in 1861.1 In 2016, MIT was ranked 7th best university in the nation in the 2016 edition of Best Colleges is National Universities.

The school’s mascot is a beaver, which MIT chose because of its “remarkable engineering and mechanical skill and its habits of industry.” High achievers from across the nation flock to MIT to gain great tutorage in their disciplines and make their market on society with their ‘geniusness.’ MIT boasts in highly regarded programs in engineering, management, and sciences. Additionally, research expenditures generally exceed $650 million each year. 2

In MIT culture, students are expected to be leaders in their respective fields and problem solvers with new novel ideas. Yet, collaboration is a high principle at MIT. In fact, sharing and service are part of this culture. Students, faculty, and support institutions are expected to work together for a common good. Given this scenario, each student must find a valuable contribution that he/she can make to the student project, teams, and industry collaborations. Even the most brilliant individual at MIT must apply some humility in being successful because they must submit to the good of the organization instead of their own selfish ambitions. The MIT Principle states that in order to achieve overall success for the organization or team, individuals at some point will have to sacrifice their own personal goals for the organization.

Dr. Green’s Visit to MIT (Animoto video) – Click Here

Humility is a character trait that will serve leaders well in a knowledge-based economy. Humility can be defined as ‘a modest or low view of one’s own importance.’ When one thinks about humility, one of the first adjectives that come to mind is humble or humbleness. Some ideas come to mind about a humble individual; not proud or arrogant. If you are a sport fan, you have probably seen star athletes that ‘show boat’ and bring attention to themselves that they are great.

Certainly, some of the greatest like Muhammad Ali used this attitude to build his own confidence. Ali noted, “At home I am a nice guy; but I don’t want the world to know. Humble people, I’ve found, don’t get very far.” Humility often requires a person to defer or submit to other people.

Jonathan Edwards, a Puritan theologian in the 18th century, examined the matter of humility in human existence; he defined a humble man as one who is sensitive to his natural distance from God.3 Thus, man has a dependency on God that shows humans their insufficiency of their own wisdom and power. Edwards explained: “Some persons are always ready to level those above them down to themselves, while they are never willing to level those below them up to their own position. But he that is under the influence of true humility will avoid both these extremes.

followers-wanted

On the one hand, he will be willing that all should rise just so far as their diligence and worth of character entitled to them; and on the other hand, he will be willing that his superiors should be known and acknowledged in their place, and have rendered to them all the honors that are due to them.” Leaders are no exception. Leadership guru, John Maxwell notes, “A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit.” The following are ways that leaders can cultivate a humble spirit:

* Have a faith that supersedes your wisdom.
* Learn lessons from each defeat, dejection, and heartache in which you have no control and are forced to humility.
* Respect others regardless of their position and title in your organization.
* Seek wise counsel from folks you trust and who have an interest in your success.
* Learn how to listen to others.

As organizations research ways to be more effective and productive, leaders explore how they can navigate uncertainty. Leaders can start by applying some humility in the manner that they relate to their employees, managers, and other stakeholders. Like MIT, individuals often need to control their own personal ambitions in light of the organization. If organizations are willing and capable to infuse their organizations with a good sense of humility, they will be infusing their organizations with a healthy trait that will serve them well in the current climate of uncertainty. I pray that it’s not too late for them!

© 2016 by Daryl D. Green

Sources

“Massachusetts Institute of Technology” by Colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com

“Jonathan Edwards” by Theopedia.com

 

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91 thoughts on “Humility in Leadership: The MIT Principle

  1. Hi Dr Green,
    This article was well-written and contained sound, practical advice. In fact, I have benefited from your article the traits of humility creates sound leaders. When we talk about the traits leaders typically exhibit, including strength, charisma, enthusiasm, and vision. One important component is often overlooked: humility [1]. The managers who exhibit the traits of humility such as seeking feedback and open to others opinion resulted in better employee engagement and job performance. John Maxwell notes, “A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit” [2].
    The quality of humility leads the leader in a better performance predictor. A good leader will share their own missteps, and how he dealt with and recovered from them, he will earn trust from his team. A good leader will learn from his action. If a leader have traits of humility which will lead to allow others strength to work for the good of the team. “For so long, we’ve talked about the power of persuasion and this over-the-top self-confidence in leaders, which is a very top-down style of leadership,” says leadership expert Rob Nielsen, coauthor of Leading with Humility [1].

    Sources:
    1. https://www.fastcompany.com/3034144/hit-the-ground-running/6-ways-humility-can-make-you-a-better-leader
    2. https://nuleadership.com/2016/09/11/humility-in-leadership-the-mit-principle/

    • Hello Lakshminarayanan,

      Thanks for leading the way in this careful discussion! Your comments are insightful. I especially found the following statement interesting: “The quality of humility leads the leader in a better performance predictor.”

      All,

      How does the quality of humility impact the effectiveness of a leader?

      Professor Green

      • yes, humble people always try to look in for ways to learn from others which leads to a measurable increase in performance. Therefore they become big achievers.
        1) A more positive mood
        2) Enhanced job satisfaction
        3) Greater engagement
        4) Improved performance

      • Hi Dr Green

        Managers who exhibit traits of humility such as seeking feedback and focusing on the needs of others often result in better employee engagement and job performance. While intelligence and skill are typically good predictors of team performance, the quality of humility – especially in a team’s leadership can be a better performance predictor.
        Leadership expert Rob Nielson, Co author of leading with humility notes “For so long, we’ve talked about the power of persuasion and this over-the-top self confidence in leaders, which is a very top-down style of leadership”

    • Peterpaul, Sad but true is the fact that we often overlook the all important trait of humility when talking about leadership. When we take a look at the greatest leaders from history though, they seem to have humility as a foundational trait of their character. Spurgeon makes a great point with his statement: “Revenge, lust, ambition, pride, and self-will are too often exalted as the gods of man’s idolatry; while holiness, peace, contentment, and humility are viewed as unworthy of a serious thought.” I am encouraged though, when I oftentimes see humility in the younger generations.

  2. At first glance one might find this article at odds with the world today. Many assume success demands a huge ego, an extreme alpha male take-no-prisoners approach. Dr. Green correctly presents the opposite. Our highest academic institutions see the value in a humble approach to learning. The same can be said for the business. Joan Lublin, a writer for the Wall Street Journal, writes, “Among executives, humility ‘is the flavor du jour,’…Companies increasingly prize humble leaders because they listen well, admit mistakes and share the limelight.”

    Lublin makes the case that successful executives are humble. They share the credit and refuse to lift themselves above their organization. They seek to meet the needs of their employees. She also says they can’t fake it, “If you have to act humble, it won’t work. You either are or you’re not.”

    I do think the greatest sign of a humble man is knowing he is just a man. As your quote about Jonathon Edwards says, “a humble man as one who is sensitive to his natural distance from God.” Truly humble men and women, even those who have reached the highest levels of society, know that they also serve a creator.

    [WC – 198]

    Sources:
    Green, D. D. (2016, September 11). Humility in Leadership: the MIT Principle. Retrieved from Nu Leadership Revolution Blog: https://nuleadership.com/2016/09/11/humility-in-leadership-the-mit-principle/

    Lublin, J. S. (2015, October 20). The Case for Humble Executives. Retrieved from The Wall Street Journal: http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-case-for-humble-executives-1445385076

    • Robert, I totally agree with you, with today generation of leadership, having an ego is almost made to seem like a characteristics of the good leader. Been humble always helps a good leader to be corrected by his workers when the leader is seem to be moving from the goal of the company. aslo with humility people are always going to be willing go an extra mile to help save a mistake.

  3. This article had some very important lessons in it that I believe people can apply to their everyday lives. I thought that it was very interesting that humility is such a big part of the culture at MIT. Now more than every humility is a very large part of being a leader because people don’t want to follow someone that doesn’t interact with them or show them respect (Feder). An example of humility that I have in my life would be from my work this summer. I worked as an electrician and a lot of problems would arise on job sites. When we would talk to my boss about it instead of getting mad or acting like he knew everything he would work with us to help and solve the problem.

    Feder, Zachary. Sahibzada, Khatera (2014, October 10) Turns Out, Humility Offers a Competitive Advantag. https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/238328

    • Hello Brandon,

      Thanks for your contribution! You brought up an excellent point about MIT. Honestly, I am sure that all of the students and faculty do not embrace the tenets of humility (I go to MIT; thus, I am GREAT). However, the folks I talked with were all about working together. One good question might be….how do we instill humility in our organizational culture?

      Professor Green

    • Brandon,

      Great job on this in-depth post! I agree with what you said about “this article had some very important lessons in it that I believe people can apply to their everyday lives.” This is the kind of stuff that can be not only applied to the business world but also to our home and everyday lives. I also thought the relationship between MIT and humility was interesting to say the least.

  4. This article is rare, in that humility is almost non-existent in today’s society. Today being humble is seen as a sign of weakness, something that your competitors will jump on to exploit you. However being humble is also appreciated by the general public, and in a business sense that helps. For example the monitors editorial board posted an article on VW adopting a leadership model of humility. In it they discuss how the new CEO, Mary Barra came forward and admitted the many mistakes that VW had made in regards to faulty airbags and the emissions scandal (MEB 2015). A great company like VW was ousted for breaking major pollution laws, and instead of hiding behind others this CEO stood up and took a big bite of humble pie. She choose to be a humble leader in this situation and it is likely to have lasting effects both internally and externally. Going to a Christian university humble leadership is almost a given, but it’s nice to know that there are people out there “in the real world” who are able to show humility in the way they live their lives

    WC (192)

    Sources:

    Will a humbled VW now adopt a leadership model of humility? By: the Monitor’s Editorial Board, Christian Science Monitor, 08827729, 10/1/2015

    • Tyler,
      I really enjoyed your response and real world example of the VW CEO showing humility in their mistake as a company. You stated: “Today being humble is seen as a sign of weakness, something that competitors will jump on to exploit you.” Sadly, I agree with you that society either views humbleness as a weakness or an opportunity for exploitation. Often times as well, humility is overlooked in a position of leadership, so for the CEO of VW to be recognized in a positive light was refreshing. Her actions demonstrate the model she is setting for the employees underneath her within the organization. Thanks for your great example!

  5. “Like MIT, individuals often need to control their own personal ambitions in light of the organization.” This reminds me of the idea of utilitarian management, ‘doing the greater good, for the greatest number.’ Although, putting ones own ambitions aside in my opinion is not directly correlated to humility. Yes, humble people often put their own desires aside, but even those with and egocentric outlook can put their own desires aside for a moment. What it takes, is the act of daily putting others, and others things ahead of your own desires. That is not to say work as a people pleaser, what I am saying is, work in a manner that not only are you taking care of your duties as a leader, but also making sure those under you are tended too as well. Romans 12:6 (NIV) says, “Live in harmony with one another. Do not be proud, but be willing to associate with people of low position. Do not be conceited.”

    Sources

    Green, D. D. (2016, September 11). Humility in Leadership: the MIT Principle. Retrieved from Nu Leadership Revolution Blog:https://nuleadership.com/2016/09/11/humility-in-leadership-the-mit-principle/

    [182]

    • Hi Tucker,

      Interesting and on message! We all have egos. It takes men and women with courage to sacrifice this for others. Jesus was the perfect model of greatness under control. I am sure there are more examples of greatness with meekness in their hearts.

      Professor Green

    • You stated “What it takes, is the act of daily putting others, and others things ahead of your own desires.” This statement is the heart and soul of humility. I strive to be a better man every day by pursuing practices such as the one in your statement, and while it can be a very difficult road to travel, exercising humility can be so rewarding. “Humility is royalty without a crown,” according to Spencer W. Kimball. Furthermore, when a group of individuals come together in pursuit of a common goal and lift each other up while placing self-interest aside, both leader and members are not only more effective but also happier. Group work suddenly becomes less of a job and more of a team-driven goal.

      [WC – 125]

      McKinney, M. (Ed.). (n.d.). Quotes on humility. Retrieved September 20, 2016, from
      http://www.leadershipnow.com/humilityquotes.html

    • You stated, “What it takes, is the act of daily putting others, and others things ahead of your own desires.” Simply stated, your argument is weak. Your philosophy is somewhat altruistic in nature, a philosophy that would deny a basic tenet of business, ambition. If people, in or outside of business, constantly put other’s ambitions and desires ahead of their own, there would never be innovation and organizations would stagnate. Humility in business means recognizing a good idea regardless of its source. This does not mean one has to sacrifice their own ambition. According to your statements, if I constantly put other’s desires ahead of my own, I will be praised as a great leader, but I now run the risk of indirectly supporting what could be a terrible idea. “Humility and presumptuousness are always two sides of the same premise, and always share the task of filling the space vacated by self-esteem in a collectivized mentality. The man who is willing to serve as the means to the ends of others, will necessarily regard others as the means to his ends.” (Ayn Rand, The Virtue of Selfishness)

      Rand, Ayn (1964). The Virtue of Selfishness. New York: New American Library.

      (WC-200)

  6. It doesn’t take much to realize that today’s society is fast paced and ever-changing. Combined with current and up-coming technology, individuals are given access to limitless resources and allowed the ability to share and connect like never before. Why is it then that we, as a whole, are more de-sensitized than ever? Pursuing and achieving “what’s mine” has become common practice. An era of self-interest has taken place, both in and out of the workplace, and a lack of humility is definitely apparent. There are those that would argue that humility has no place in a work environment; however, Frostenson (2016) identifies that there are numerous ways leaders can “link the intra-personal and intra-organizational perspective on humility to an inter-organizational one.” While I can’t speak for effective ways to change the current mindset, I can wholly agree that humility is necessary for effective leadership and group activities. It should not only be the goal of a leader, but also the goal of the group members, to lift each other up while remaining humble.
    [WC – 173]
    Frostenson, M. (2016). Humility in Business: A Contextual Approach. Journal Of Business Ethics, 138(1), 91-102. doi:10.1007/s10551-015-2601-9

    • You stated “It should not only be the goal of a leader, but also the goal of the group members, to lift each other up while remaining humble.” In reference to having humility and I completely agree with this statement with having humility as a leader first of all it will provide the leader with the humility to listen to people under him that could suggest great ideas for any problem that the leader is struggling with. I believe as a leader having humility and listening to others it would provide less stress on myself to not have to do everything myself. For groups wise the same aspect as being a leader applies. Having the humility to trust that others may know something you don’t is key. As Lars Tønder states “the one-sidedness of believing that others can learn from oneself but not the other way around” (Tønder, 011).

      Work cited

      Tønder, L. (2011). Humility, Arrogance and the Limitations of Kantian Autonomy: A Response to Rostbøll. Political Theory, 39(3), 378-385. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/23036150
      [WC-174]

      • Tyler,

        I love your statement about “the leader with the humility to listen to people under him that could suggest great ideas for any problem that the leader is struggling with.” It stood out to me for two reasons 1) groups and their effectiveness and 2) humility as a cycle. In management groups are more effective at problem solving and coming up with alternatives due to differentiation in expertise though it takes more time than if accomplished by one individual. Humility is the difference between having strong relationships and a thriving organizational culture versus an aggression work environment which will eventually hinder the performance of a company due to egos and A-type conflict (pointing fingers). Being humble serves the individual displaying the attitude as can be seen in your above statement. Ezra Taft Benson stated “pride is concerned with who is right. Humility is concerned with what is right.” In marketing this is important because it aligns itself with being ethical.

        [WC-161]
        Benson, Ezra T. (n.d.). Pride and Humility. Retrieved September 24, 2016.

      • Tyler, you stated, “I believe as a leader having humility and listening to others it would provide less stress on myself to not have to do everything myself.” I think a great leader should have humility and confidence to let others complete tasks for them. A leader already has a great deal of work that they have to juggle and they might not do everything efficiently if they do not let others lighten their load. It may be more beneficial to hand over a task rather than doing it yourself. Harvard Business Review stated, “Good managers attract candidates, drive performance, engagement and retention, and play a key role in maximizing employees’ contribution to the firm”. Good managers think of the company before they think of themselves.

        [WC – 147]

        @. (2014). If You’re Not Helping People Develop, You’re Not Management Material. Retrieved September 25, 2016, from https://hbr.org/2014/01/if-youre-not-helping-people-develop-youre-not-management-material

    • Brant you said” While I can’t speak for effective ways to change the current mindset, I can wholly agree that humility is necessary for effective leadership and group activities.” I agree that humility and grit are necessary for leadership positions. Anyone that has had a patronizing employer or an know it all coworker cold agree that there is practically no worse situation to be in. That being said humility and being humble are again traits that are being lost in today’s world. We are constantly put in a spotlight and told to preform and promote what we do best. “The most significant way that internal competition derails collaboration involves trust. How can we trust one another if we’re competing in a dog-eat-dog culture?” (Competition at work, Hedges). It seems that culture itself is working against ethics and trust in todays world. As such it would be wise to remember and stay in the word moving forward in life and in the workplace.

      Kristi Hedges, Competition at Work Positive or positively awful?
      http://www.forbes.com/sites/work-in-progress/2015/07/08/competition-at-work-positive-or-positively-awful/2/#389a395404bb

      WC-172

  7. This article about the MIT principle is basically telling us about the importance of humility. According the biblical script: from the book of Matthew 23:12 says those who exalt themselves will be humbled and those who humble themselves will be exalted and again in proverbs 16:18,19 says a mans pride shall bring him low: but honor shall uphold the humble in spirit. Most often time when people are asked to give characteristic of a great leaders humility seem to be ignored, because when a leader show that traits people might think it makes him vulnerable to getting taken advantage off. “Humility is a true key success. Successful people lose their way at times. They often embrace and over-indulge from the fruits of the success. Humility halts this arrogance and self –indulging trap. Humble people share the credit and wealth, remaining focused and hungry to continue the journey to success.” (Rick Pinto). I think without humility it would be very hard for people to show respect for others. And even before we even thinking about rising up we have to go down to help ourselves build foundation humility. Again according to Harvard business review, Google’s SVP of people operation, Lazlo Bock says humility is one of he traits he is looking for in hires, “is what can we do together to problem-solve. I’ve contributed my piece, and then I step back.” And it is not just humility in creating space for others to contribute, says Bock its “intellectual humility. Without humility, you are unable to learn.”
    [WC 197]

    • You stated — ” I think without humility it would be very hard for people to show respect for others.”

      I agree with this completely. Why? It’s easy to be in a position of power and have no regard for those below you, but usually when that happens things aren’t done or aren’t done with the efficiency that is possible. Group work, especially, is something that requires mutual respect throughout all participants, and even though there might be a leader in that group, there must be respect. As a leader, you must have a vision and find a way to have those below you share that same vision and take steps to accomplish it. So if you aren’t respected because you fail to respect others, they will fail to care on whether you are successful or not. Coming from a background of team athletics, one thing I’ve learned is: “You’re only as strong as the weakest link.” In this situation, the weakest link(s) would be those who don’t respect you. Respect is a foundation that MUST be set in order to be successful, no matter how you value success. [WC 189]

    • Gideon,

      I like your use of scripture and the comment about the humble being honored. Interesting that some people in society become famous for doing just the opposite. The more bombastic and self honoring they are, the more attention they seem to get. Thanks for sharing.

  8. Humility is difficult to maintain, especially within a business. There are superiors such as your boss, and there are people who get paid less than you. It is easy to be at the top and say that you are better than everyone else. No one will respect the person at the top that knows everything, but a leader that takes the blame and gives the credit will be the leader everyone wants to follow. According to Jeanine Prime and Elizabeth Salib, “In diverse workgroups, displays of humility may help to remind group members of their common humanity and shared objectives.” (Jeanine Prime and Elizabeth Salib 2014). Others will display humility, which creates a friendly environment. My dad always told me that it is good to be confident, but never be cocky.

    [WC – 131]

    Prime, J., & Salib, E. (2014). The Best Leaders Are Humble Leaders. Retrieved September 20, 2016, from https://hbr.org/2014/05/the-best-leaders-are-humble-leaders

    • I absolutely agree with you! Your father taught you right, in my eyes. A lot of the times people confuse cockiness with confidence because they are too cocky, or because they just have not seen a difference between the two. Being on top and thinking that you are the best, in my opinion, will never get you respect. What a wonderful choice of a source!

  9. You stated, “Even the most brilliant individual at MIT must apply some humility in being successful because they must submit to the good of the organization instead of their own selfish ambitions” (Green, 2016)

    This is a concept that has been lost today—not only in business, but in society as well. Too many times, someone’s big ego has been the Achilles tendon to their business tribulations. When the bible says “the love of money is the root of all evil” it wasn’t lying. Too many times, we are blinded by money and what it can do for us. Selfless leadership qualities are perceived much better. “Employees who perceived altruistic behavior from their managers also reported being more innovative, suggesting new product ideas and ways of doing work better” (Prime, Salib, 2014). In business it is important to remember that the people who work for you feel needed and wanted—that is only achieved by a humble attitude. Employee loyalty will better your chances of having a successful company.

    [WC – 169]

    Green, D. D. (2016). Humility in Leadership: the MIT Principle. Retrieved from Nu Leadership Revolution from https://nuleadership.com/2016/09/11/humility-in-leadership-the-mit-principle/

    Prime, J., & Salib, E. (2014). The Best Leaders Are Humble Leaders. Retrieved September 20, 2016, from https://hbr.org/2014/05/the-best-leaders-are-humble-leaders

  10. You stated — “Respect others regardless of their position and title in your organization” is a good way to cultivate a humble spirit. I agree, because mutual respect between individuals is critical, especially in a business setting. The reason being is that without mutual respect, there is obviously no trust, and without trust, the efficiency of any project having to be done between individuals goes down dramatically. If one person doesn’t trust the other to make a decision, then that project could easily fail. It is important in a leader to respect everyone around him, whether below or above. Though the idea of power is in play when a person outranks another, it does not necessarily always mean that person respects the person in power. [WC 125]

  11. Humility in leadership can be highly overlooked in today’s society. People are willing to do whatever it takes to make themselves more successful despite how it might affect those around them. The content of this article reminded me of servant leadership. Andrey Shirin stated that a servant leader is, “the one who first senses a natural desire to serve. Then this individual makes a conscious choice to lead. This is in sharp contrast with people who are leaders first, including those whose decision to serve may come only after their leadership is established.” I strongly believe that taking the time to serve those who we could easily just write off as unimportant or less qualified than us has a profound impact on them, and is key to winning the respect of those we are in a position of leadership over. Prioritizing humility in leadership and having an outward focused mindset sets you apart in a world that is becoming more and more inwardly focused.

    References
    Shirin, A. V. (2015). Is Servant Leadership Inherently Christian?. Journal Of Religion & Business Ethics, 3(2), 1-25.

    (WC-182)

    • You stated: “Prioritizing humility in leadership and having an outward focused mindset sets you apart in a world that is becoming more and more inwardly focused.” I agree with this completely. As the world of business grows and adapts to an inwardly focused society, humility becomes all the more important. John Baldoni, a writer for the Harvard Business Review, says: “When people act humbly, they are acknowledging their limitations and accepting that they cannot go it alone. This mindset is valuable to a team because it serves as an invitation for others to help” (2009). The idea that humility conveys weakness is beside the point, it creates an initiative among co-workers striving to lift the humble to new heights and help with the process. Humility builds teamwork in a healthy way.

      Baldoni, J. (2009). Use Humility to Improve Performance. Harvard Business Review. Retrieved from https://hbr.org/2009/11/use-humility-to-improve-perfor

      [WC – 145]

  12. You stated, “everybody goes by their first names, doctorate or not.”I really like that attitude at MIT. In Croatia, where I am from we have to call our professors/teachers by their title. My friend, from Denmark, told me that they have the same approach to their professors as at MIT. It makes everyone equal. Also you stated “Everyone here is smart. If someone comes in cocky, there is someone who is smarter than him in another area.” I did not fully understand what you meant here. Why would anyone be cocky if anyone is called by their first name instead of doctor, professor, or teacher?

    Sources
    Green, D. D. (2016, September 11). Humility in Leadership: the MIT Principle. Retrieved from Nu Leadership Revolution Blog:https://nuleadership.com/2016/09/11/humility-in-leadership-the-mit-principle/

    [WC- 126]

  13. You stated, “everybody goes by their first names, doctorate or not.”I really like that attitude at MIT. In Croatia, where I am from we have to call our professors/teachers by their title. My friend, from Denmark, told me that they have the same approach to their professors as at MIT. It makes everyone equal. Also you stated “Everyone here is smart. If someone comes in cocky, there is someone who is smarter than him in another area.” I did not fully understand what you meant here. Why would anyone be cocky if anyone is called by their first name instead of doctor, professor, or teacher?

    Sources
    Green, D. D. (2016, September 11). Humility in Leadership: the MIT Principle. Retrieved from Nu Leadership Revolution Blog:https://nuleadership.com/2016/09/11/humility-in-leadership-the-mit-principle/

    [WC- 126]

    • What Professor Greens means by “Everyone here is smart. If someone comes in cocky, there is someone who is smarter than him in another area” is that everyone should be treated exactly the same. While one person may be good at one area, they could be not as good as someone else in another area. MIT wants to prevent people from being cocky because goes against the environment that they are trying to create. When calling someone by their title, that person is automatically being put on a higher level than those without that title. It is safe to say that in many cultures by calling someone by their first name, it means that you are on the same level as them.

      Green, D. (2016). Humility in Leadership: The MIT Principle. Retrieved September 24, 2016, from https://nuleadership.com/2016/09/11/humility-in-leadership-the-mit-principle/

      [WC 139]

      • Amanda,

        You made a good point when you cited Professor Green. People has tendency to think because they are the best in one area they do not think and “forget” the fact that they are not as good in others areas, but they do more care about what make them “powerful”, “superior” than what can make them better. “Students, faculty, and support institutions are expected to work together for a common good” in this situation they are different level but because of humility and team work, people are making good thing. Title, level are not part of the deal, respect between each person and humility of knowing that are not the best in every areas make them do great things.

        Green, /Daryl. “Nu Leadership Revolution Blog.” Nu Leadership Revolution Blog. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Sept. 2016.

  14. This blog discussion reminds me of a great quote by C.S. Lewis, which states that “true humility is not thinking less of yourself; it is thinking of yourself less” (Lewis). I think this is something that people struggle with, especially in the business setting. Humility should be the driving force for members of a company, especially the leaders, managers, CEO’s, etc. A company might not be getting the sales that they expected and are teetering on the brink of going out of business, but they should be reminded of Lewis’ quote in order to avoid thinking less of themselves. A company’s main focus besides making sales and earning a profit should be to better society with their products or services that they offer; that is the concept of thinking of yourself less. C.S. Lewis, in addition to being a great philosopher, gives us Christian ideals to live off of, even in the business setting.

    Lewis, C. S. (1952). Mere Christianity. New York: MacMillan Pub.

    (164)

  15. Dr. Green,

    I really enjoyed your piece on humility. This character trait is definitely overlooked in our society today. I believe that in today’s world, individuals struggle to get by with less praise than they deserve. A true leader strives for greatest each and every day whether they are praised for their accomplishments or not. Frostenson states, “In a management team, that responsiveness is a product of diversity—managers must humbly accept that their own perspectives need to be broadened by others” (Frostenson/Kallasvuo 91). This quote goes back to respect as you have talked about in your post. Respect for others goes hand in hand with humility.

    “Humility in Business” by OBU http://eds.b.ebscohost.com/

    [WC-115]

    • Alex,

      You stated: Respect for others goes hand in hand with humility.

      My response: I agree with your statement because without respect, one cannot attain humility. Respect and humility stems from loving others. As Christians, we are called to love everyone and expect nothing in return. Love is selfless. When you love others, people will grow to respect you. This is important in business. A leader should be selfless and humble towards everyone, even towards people who has a lower position or status. While these words are easy to say, it is difficult to put others before yourself all of the time. As Todd Smith states, “It’s a practiced trait that requires constant monitoring, especially since arrogance—egotism, superiority, conceit— is always tugging at our human nature.” (Smith 2016). Each one of us can relate to the this quote because we all feel pulled to always have a “me” attitude. It may be difficult, but the rewards are endless when you put others before yourself and show God’s love to everyone.

      [WC- 171]

      Smith, T. (2016). Want Respect? Practice Humility. Retrieved September 22, 2016, from http://www.littlethingsmatter.com/blog/2010/08/26/want-respect-practice-humility/

  16. This is an excellent topic for discussion, considering much of the “culture” today. Humility, is ill defined as something that makes someone weak and submissive, with low self-esteem. John Toussaint, MD describes the desired behavior as improvement leadership. This type of leadership requires leaders to approach their work and their colleagues with humility rather than autocracy. Leaders need to adopt the habits of observing the workplace with curiosity, seeking to understand the problems of frontline workers, and helping to create positive change. Instead of embracing an attitude of “the buck stops here/’ leaders need to become facilitators of improvement efforts. In general these leadership traits are by nature not touted as valuable by today’s multimedia culture.
    The Canadian born Astronaut Chris Hadfield describes leadership as, ultimately not being about glorious crowning acts. It’s about keeping your team focused on a goal and motivated to do their best to achieve it, especially when the stakes are high and the consequences really matter. It is about laying the groundwork for others’ success, and then standing back and letting them shine.
    [WC 178]
    Toussaint, J. S. (2015). A Rapidly Adaptable Management System. Journal Of Healthcare Management, 60(5), 312-315.
    Chris Hadfield. (n.d.). BrainyQuote.com. Retrieved September 21, 2016, from BrainyQuote.com Web site: http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/c/chris_hadfield.html

  17. You stated, “Egos are checked at the door (well everyone is brilliant)… Even brilliant students at MIT need humility in order to be successful on campus.” I agree! This could be seen as especially being true at OBU, a Christian Liberal Arts University, because humility is something Christ showed in his life. In today’s world, it is hard to come across humility in a person’s day-to-day life (whether that be at work or in college). In his article, Frostenson (2016) stated, “Humility becomes a grace, something bestowed on man. Words and deeds are not self-sufficient for the humble man” (p. 93). Humility can show people that you are not too self-centered, and that you are willing and ready to learn.

    Frostenson, M. (2016). Humility in Business: A Contextual Approach. Journal Of Business Ethics, 138(1),
    91-102. doi:10.1007/s10551-015-2601-9

    [WC-137]

    • Jessica,
      You stated, “In today’s world, it is hard to come across humility in a person’s day-to-day life (whether that be at work or in college).” This is all too true because people have become quite selfish and do not see the value in humility like they should. I like how you pointed out that at OBU we try to be more humble because it is Christ-like. This is one of the reasons I love the people and professors at OBU. As stated by Magnus Frostenson, “humility as a virtue corresponds to a truthful representation of what business is as a practice. It is simply a good thing to possess a personal trait or quality that helps you understand the nature of business as a dependency structure if you want to be a good business leader” (2016, p.100)

      Frostenson, M. (2016). Humility in Business: A Contextual Approach. Journal Of Business Ethics, 138(1), 91-102. doi:10.1007/s10551-015-2601-9

      [WC-155]

  18. Dr. Green,

    In your article you stated John Maxwell’s quote, “A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit”. I love this quote, because that is completely true in all organizations. Nobody wants to be led by someone who thinks of themselves more highly than what they are, or to take more credit than what they deserve. these types of leaders make the work environment less effective, and it can even turn the leader’s employees away from them. An effective leader not only leads, but makes their team or work group grow and be more efficient. Prime and Salib of the Harvard Business Review states, “Inclusive leaders empower others to lead. By reversing roles, leaders not only facilitate employees’ development but they model the act of taking a different perspective”. With this, humble leaders try to involve their employees with the growing of their business, and make their employees fell like they are more important then just laborers.

    Green, D. D. (2016, September 11). Humility in Leadership: the MIT Principle. Retrieved from Nu Leadership Revolution
    Prime, J., @ Salib, E. (2014, May 12). The Best Leaders Are Humble Leaders. Retrieved September 21, 2016

    • You stated: “Nobody wants to be led by someone who thinks of themselves more highly than what they are, or to take more credit than what they deserve.”

      Frankie, I totally agree with your statement. Leaders are usually put in the position that they are because they have the ability to bring people together and get the job done. Some leaders get put in leadership position because they have connections–this is when the door is opened for the leader to get a big head. Leaders that are servant leaders prove to be more effective. I know I like working for people who are willing to do the dirty work themselves.

      You also stated: “An effective leader not only leads, but makes their team or work group grow and be more efficient.”

      This is so important; but what is even more important than that is this: knowing people and knowing how to motivate each individual. Everybody is motivated differently and everyone takes criticism differently. I know from experience that getting a group to work together effectively is difficult. It requires you to know each individual well enough to know how to communicate to them specifically. You also must know how to get them to work with their team–understanding team dynamics (What Is Leadership).

      What Is Leadership? (n.d.). Retrieved September 24, 2016, from https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newLDR_41.htm

  19. Dr. Green,

    This truly is a well-written article. It is not every day one sees a professional article emphasizing the need for such an effective spiritual practice. Humility is far more important than society makes it out to be. If a business can utilize this practice effectively, the benefits of it would be substantial. Traditionally, humility tends to be associated with weakness or false confidence. On the contrary, humility can bring about a new sort of confidence not just in the individual practicing it, but also in the people who surround him or her. By effecting the overall atmosphere of a business — or even a university for that matter — those enveloped in it can avoid potential conflicts, work toward the vision of the company constantly, and create a reputation worth noticing.

    Green, D. D. (2016, September 11). Humility in Leadership: the MIT Principle. Retrieved from Nu Leadership Revolution Blog:https://nuleadership.com/2016/09/11/humility-in-leadership-the-mit-principle/

    [WC – 151]

  20. Dr. Green,

    I found this article very intriguing and especially liked the quote from John Maxwell saying “A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit”. I feel as if this quote shows what a good leader is and what a true leaders internal beliefs should surround. Personally, I believe that an effective leader has to be humble and in doing so, this leader will gain support from his peers because lets face it, nobody likes someone who is good at something and cocky about it. You also stated different ways a leader can cultivate a humble spirit in your article and I read two things that seemed especially important. These two things are the ability to learn from previous mistakes or failures and the ability to listen to others. I feel that if a person in a leadership role is able to master these two concepts, I feel as if they will be an effective leader. An effective leader not only leads others, but leads in a manner that others will want to follow them. This translates over to the business world because an effective leader will almost certainly be better at satisfying employees and bringing in a profit all at once.

    W.C.- 194

    Green, D. D. (2016, September 11). Humility in Leadership: the MIT Principle. Retrieved from Nu Leadership Revolution

    • Joshua,

      In your article you quoted that, “An effective leader has to be humble and in doing so, this leader will gain support from his peers”. This is a true statement, a manager does not have to be the best motivational, inspiring, or vocal leader to have their employees follow and work for them with effectiveness and efficiency. However, managers need to have a form of humbleness to them. In Forbes, Ryan Westwood states, “An entrepreneur must be open to ideas, improve listening, support a strong team, be willing to make mistakes, delegate, and recognize team efforts to lead his employees and his company to company stability and greater success”. Like you stated, nobody is going to want to work for somebody who is so self-confident, and cocky. It drives the employees to a state of resentment instead of following and wanting to work for that manager. This then leads to a negative environment in the workplace that will also lead to a decrease in efficiency.

      W.C. 181
      Westwood, R. (2015, February 5). Humility: The Secret To Confident Leadership. Retrieved September 21, 2016.

    • Josh,

      I enjoyed the comments you have presented from Dr. Green’s blog post above. I felt the same way about your claim that states, “nobody likes someone who is good at something and cocky about.” There takes a degree of confidence for an individual to become a great leader. However, if a person is confident about what they do and boastful as well, this does not set well with the majority of people in a business. One must be humble and forever willing to help others. From experience in sports, I truly feel that I have the most respect for men who lead by example. Individuals who lead by example always do what is asked and more with a great attitude. Someone can talk all they want but I’m a firm believer in “practicing what you preach.” I also liked the quote by John Maxwell that states, “A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit.” This quote falls right in line with my beliefs of humility and leadership.

      Green, D.D.(2016, September 11). Humility in Leadership: the MIT Principle.
      Retrieved from Nu Leadership Revolution

      [WC-204]

  21. Dr. Green,
    I like the five characteristics of a humble leader that you described, especially the one that reads, “Respect others regardless of their position and title in your organization.” The Bible tells us that, “Whoever wants to become great among you must be your servant,” (Matthew 20:26). Where I work, I have four different managers. Some of them are difficult to approach, because they commonly treat employees as lazy or incompetent, often without good reason. On the other hand, the other managers are friendly and caring, which makes them easy to communicate with and work for. Those managers display traits of humility, and do not emphasize their superiority among subordinates for no good reason. This makes them better leaders. After observing multiple companies, one management expert said that the common truth among them was: “If you think you’re good, you’re dead,” (Buster 1997). By this, he means that in both leadership and business, abandoning a humble attitude can lead to failure. Practicing humility in your heart and your outward behaviors will keep you from being complacent in your endeavors, because you will never act as if you are number one.

    [WC – 191]

    Buster, W. (1997). Humility–the best and safest way to excellence. Thrust For
    Educational Leadership, 27(1), 19.
    Matthew 20:26. (2009). In Holman Christian Standard Bible. Nashville, TN:
    Holman Bible.

    • Sarah, I like how you used scripture in your response to Professor Green. In Addition to your quote, I want to add another one for you. “Be devoted to one another in love. Honor one another above yourselves” (Romans 12:10). I love this scripture because it reminds me to love people and to treat them how you want to be treated, especially in the work place. I’ve been lucky to have the opportunity to work for several companies that are Christian based. I think it is a much better environment to work in since everyone tries to be a good person.

      Romans 12:10. (2009). In Holman Christian Standard Bible. Nashville, TN: Holman Bible.

      WC [101]

      • Hey Alex! Thanks for adding another verse to this conversation. And I agree with what you said; if we would all “honor one another” above ourselves in the workplace, everyone would be better off (Romans 12:10). Where I work, there are some people who act according to this instruction, and others that do not. It really does make a difference in your workplace experience, and it also makes it easy to figure out who you do and do not like to work with. Even though it is extremely difficult sometimes, we have to always try to work as part of a team and not only look out for ourselves at work, no matter what everyone else is doing. To me, that is another requirement of acting with humility.

        [WC – 129]
        Romans 12:10. (2009). In Holman Christian Standard Bible. Nashville, TN: Holman Bible.

  22. Dr. Green,
    You stated “the MIT Principle is developed so that all leaders understand that even high achievers need a sense of humility to work in high performing organization.” I completely agree with this statement, when not only MIT students but anyone working in some of type of group or organization the members all could believe that they know everything and do not need help which would lead to misunderstand and arguments happening rather than using that time to make progress. When everyone has humility it provides everyone with the ability to actually listen to everyone and their ideas with less argument if any which like I stated earlier in this paragraph can lead to progress and of course high performance for the group as a whole. Also having humility by listening to the others in your group they could teach something you may not have known. As Lars Tonder stated “the one-sidedness of believing that others can learn from oneself but not the other way around” (Tonder 2011).

    Tønder, L. (2011). Humility, Arrogance and the Limitations of Kantian Autonomy: A Response to Rostbøll. Political Theory, 39(3), 378-385. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/23036150

    [WC-192]

  23. Dr. Green,
    You stated “the MIT Principle is developed so that all leaders understand that even high achievers need a sense of humility to work in high performing organization.” I completely agree with this statement, when not only MIT students but anyone working in some of type of group or organization the members all could believe that they know everything and do not need help which would lead to misunderstand and arguments happening rather than using that time to make progress. When everyone has humility it provides everyone with the ability to actually listen to everyone and their ideas with less argument if any which like I stated earlier in this paragraph can lead to progress and of course high performance for the group as a whole. Also having humility by listening to the others in your group they could teach something you may not have known. As Lars Tonder stated “the one-sidedness of believing that others can learn from oneself but not the other way around” (Tonder 2011).

    Work Cited

    Tønder, L. (2011). Humility, Arrogance and the Limitations of Kantian Autonomy: A Response to Rostbøll. Political Theory, 39(3), 378-385. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/23036150

    [WC-194]

  24. This article is a great representation of how self-centered the world has become. Instead of caring for other people’s needs, society tells us that it is important to be the best and have the best of the best. While this concept is valued in the world, it is not valued in God’s eyes. In Dr. Green’s Intro to Marketing class at Oklahoma Baptist University, he pointed out that having a relationship with God is the only race where you win before you start the race. As Christians, it is important to remember that we do not have all the answers and we will need help sometimes. At one point in the blog you stated that, “High achievers from across the nation flock to MIT to gain great tutorage in their disciplines and make their market on society with their ‘geniusness.’” and yet MIT the students and professors to check their ego before they enter. It is not something seen very often in today’s society and it is a perfect example how we as Christians need to approach the working environment.

    Green, D. (2016, September 11). Nu Leadership Revolution Blog. Retrieved September 21, 2016, from https://nuleadership.com/

    [WC 197]

  25. Dr. Green,
    In the beginning of your article you said, “Many people feel that leadership is about being the brightest and sharpest ‘cat on the block.’’ (Green, 2016) Although an individual must be smart and talented in his or her field to obtain a leadership position, I don’t believe that you have to be the smartest person in the organization. A leader may have an important role, but he or she is still a part of the team just like everyone else. Meaning, a person possesses leadership qualities, which is why they are put into a leadership position, but all of the other team members have certain unique qualities that make them perfect for their positions. In my internship at First Mortgage Company, I’ve seen our Branch Manager put into practice humility in leadership. He is always willing to help, no matter how low you fall on the totem poll. And if he can’t help you, not only is he willing to admit that he doesn’t know, he will find someone who can assist you, and he will usually stay to learn as well.

    [WC-200]

    Green, D. D. (2016, September 11). Humility in Leadership: the MIT Principle. Retrieved from Nu Leadership Revolution

  26. Dr. Green,

    I really enjoyed this article because I think humility is very underrated in today’s society. We have become so consumed in ourselves with the presence of social media that it has become a competition to see who can be the best. Humility is important in leaders because it makes it easier to follow them. My supervisor at work is very humble and treats me as an equal, which in turn makes me respect her more. It can also create a more efficient environment if a leader recognizes their weaknesses and can ask for the help of someone stronger in those areas. As stated by Bradley Owens and David Hekman, “Acknowledging
    weaknesses leaves leaders open to learning from and appreciating those who are skilled in areas where the leader may be lacking” (2016).

    Owens, B. P., & Hekman, D. R. (2016). How does leader humility influence team performance? Exploring the mechanisms of contagion and collective promotion focus. Academy Of Management Journal, 59(3), 1088-1111. doi:10.5465/amj.2013.0660

  27. Dr. Green,
    I totally agree with your views about humility. It is the typical qualities in most of the leaders. In my opinion, the real power of the humble leader is something that everyone is looking for. It helps the smooth running of the process, inspire everyone. When receiving members expressed self-aware behavior, opinion, openness to feedback and ideas, appreciation of others, that is leadership helped inspire them.The best leaders are the people behind the scenes who guide their employees and let them shine. This quieter leadership approach listening, being transparent, being aware of limitations and appreciating employees’ strengths and contributions is also a highly effective way to engage employees (Michelle M. Smith, 2016).

    I will share a conversation with MIT guy. I did meet a good guy who graduates MIT four years ago in Vietnam. He is a genius in the automating array but he never knew what is humility. He said his story when he works at a factory. He always removes or skips the opinions of others even if they have been doing this job for over 20 years. The business culture of Vietnam and America are very different. In my country, almost all of the machines in the factory was bought old version or old time. Therefore, the machines work not correctly and effectively. He changed many accessories of the machine that makes the machine broken completely. He had a big lesson in humility. This story helps our understand more than about humility. Whether you have talent like the genius, you must have humility and listening.

    On the other hand, I don’t think we can easily become a humble leader. Especially When we have an intelligence, competence, and mastership. we tend to require employees must do all things with our desire. Therefore, I think humility is special virtues that a person must study if he/she want to become a great leader.

    Smith, M. M. (n.d.). Humility Is Key to Effective Leadership & High Performance. Retrieved September 21, 2016, from http://www.executiveforums.com/resource.php?rID=1100

  28. Dr. Green,
    In today’s society it is almost unheard of in the workplace, schools, and even homes to practice humility. The word alone has dwindled from our vocabulary. You mentioned from Edwards’ text that a humble man is “one who is sensitive to his natural distance from God. Thus, man has a dependency on God that shows humans their insufficiency of their own wisdom and power.” This statement is so strong. I think what drives our society today is power. We want more, and when we get more it is never enough to fill our satisfaction. The characteristics of being rich and high in prestige start when we are young due to the strong influences of our society. When we do grow mature it is in our system to thrive to be on top. Once we have received the highest honor in our work place, become boss, or even the highest paid, we yet again feel like it has not completely filled our full satisfaction. We thrive off power and personal success and we need to realize as humans, students, employees, bosses, etc. that it is not success, money, fame, ourselves, or others that can fill our hearts, but yet our distance and dependency on God. You also mentioned another comment from Edwards, “Some persons are always ready to level those above them down to themselves, while they are never willing to level those below them up to their own position. But he that is under the influence of true humility will avoid both these extremes.” I also enjoyed this piece of text. It is so crucial that we begin to practice humility, and instead of bringing people above you down and not offering to build those up below you, maybe we instead should self reflect and allow ourselves to encourage. Along the way we may be surprised to see an increase in our own success.
    Thank you for this piece Dr. Green, humility is a subject that never goes out of style and should always be practiced in our daily walks. Your piece of encouragement is appreciated.

    Works Cited:
    Green, D. D. (2016, September 11). Humility in Leadership: the MIT Principle. Retrieved from Nu Leadership Revolution

    [WC-348]

  29. Dr. Green,
    First off, I would like to say that this was a well-written, engaging article that certainly will challenge all kinds of people to be humble in the different kinds of work they do. I have not read or heard of too many articles, pertaining to business, that simply challenge people to live in a way that makes other people better. Even though I did love the article I thought it was interesting that MIT actually strives for their students to be humble. Although students may be humble while in class because “if someone comes in cocky, there is someone who is smarter than him in another area” may be true I feel like outside of the classroom these students will be prideful by how much they know compared to an average person (Green, 2016). Never the less, this article was challenging and a great read for all.

    Green, D. D. (2016, September 11). Humility in Leadership: the MIT Principle. Retrieved from Nu Leadership Revolution

    [WC-167]

  30. The idea of humility is something that is long forgotten by our current society. It is misperceived by a lot of people, obviously which is seen with the Muhammad Ali quote. Humility is not a weakness, in life or business. Being a servant leader and showing humility is actually a huge benefit. It gives an example of good character that should be promoted in the work place. If the leaders of a business follow this example, their employees will follow suit, creating a good workplace. Robert Greenleaf states that once one aspires to serve, he aspires to lead as well. Greenleaf (2013) also states in his article “The organization exists for the person as much as the person exists for the organization.” The idea of humility in the workplace are very overlooked, but can prove to be incredibly influential. It is easy though to allow an ego to grow unchecked, but finding a balance between confidence and humility will create a strong leader both in the workplace and the world. Humility leadership is a very Biblically supported fact, for example, when Jesus teaches his disciples that the whoever will be great must be a servant first and whoever wants to be a servant will be a slave. Adopting the mindsight of humility is an incredibly freeing and rewarding mindsight. Servant leadership is true leadership.

    WC-224

    Sources:

    Limited, H. (2013). Servant Leadership: The case for the best leadership philosophy. Retrieved September 21, 2016, from http://www.hr.com/en/topleaders/all_articles/servant- leadership-the-case-for-the-best-leadershi_i9433508.html

    47 Bible Verses about Servant Leaders. (n.d.). Retrieved September 21, 2016, from https://www.openbible.info/topics/servant_leaders

    • You stated, “If the leaders of a business follow this example (being humble), their employees will follow suit, creating a good workplace” I could not agree more. The trickle down of an attitude held by a manager is every apparent in todays work culture. As Marcel Schwantes said, “Leadership has been written and talked about for decades, with great authors defining it in different ways calling it different things. In the end, most of these folks have been talking about the same things. And that is the simple truth that leadership and life are about people and relationships” Building relationships takes humility!

      Schwantes, Marcel. The case for the best leadership philosophy. Retrieved September 21, 2016, from http://www.hr.com/en/topleaders/all_articles/servant- leadership-the-case-for-the-best-leadershi_i9433508.html

      [118]

  31. Dr. Green,
    One quote from your article really stood out to me. this quote reads, “One MIT staff member explains this reality, “Everyone here is smart.” If someone comes in cocky, there is someone who is smarter than him in another area. That keeps people ‘in check’”(Green 2016). This stood out to me because I believe that this doesn’t just apply to MIT, but it also applies to the workforce, athletics, and overall life in general. In anything that this life offers, there will always be someone smarter, stronger, and better than ones self. I believe a way to over come this is to work hard and become the best ones self can be. All the while being humble once reaching the top. James 4:10 reads, “Humble yourselves before the Lord, and he will lift you up”(NIV). With all of this being said, if one works to the best of their ability, while being humble and giving the glory to God, they can rest on a life of satisfaction.

    WC [171]

    Green, D. D. (2016, September 11). Humility in Leadership: the MIT Principle. Retrieved from Nu Leadership Revolution

  32. It’s about time that someone talks about humility in leadership.
    How can someone become a leader without humbling themselves first? Understanding roles gives way to respect (no matter the role) and respect is the ladder to leadership- after all, respect is the fuel to the leadership fire.
    Let’s take “Bob” for example- Bob works in an environment filled with coworkers who think highly of themselves and take others for granted. Bob doesn’t necessarily respect his coworkers because of their attitudes, so when these peers ask something of Bob, he does not fulfill it to his potential. Therefore, the project/product/service is lost within the translation of the hierarchical ladder.
    Another example could be that of an employee that does not know his or her own place, causing the chain of events previously mentioned.
    Humble personalities and respect for those above and below on the ladder create healthy work environments for all different types of events. Attitudes as such lead to greater outcomes in terms of product quality, customer approval and employee happiness.

    [WC – 197]

    Smyth, B. (2015). The Need for Humility in the Workplace – NST Insights – Career News, Workplace Issues, Employee Development. Retrieved September 21, 2016, from http://insights.nationalseminarstraining.com/753/the-need-for-humility-in-the-workplace/.

  33. Humility is a key component that any person should have, especially those that are in leader positions. No one is going to respect a leader that is all about him self and does nothing to show that he is helping the group. Just like in basketball the leader of the team does not just sit on the sideline while everyone else is practicing because he is better than everyone, he is out there working hard and leading by example. The perfect leader is not just trying to succeed but he is trying to make everyone succeed, Kobe said it best “The important thing is that your teammates have to know you’re pulling for them and you really want them to be successful.” (Bryant) this is how every person should live their life, with humility and respect for others.

    Bryant, K. (2016) Retrieved September 21, 2016, from http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/k/kobe_bryant.html

    [WC 148]

  34. This article really opened my eyes as to how some of the greatest minds cooperate effectively to achieve a higher goal. Knowing that there is always someone there at MIT that is going to know more than you in a certain area would definitely be humbling. A leader with humility is someone I would love to work with. Working with a humble person makes it easier to communicate with them and not be afraid of judgment for asking a question they may think is elementary. I worked at a sheet metal shop this past summer and was overwhelmed with how much knowledge was needed to operate the machinery. However, I was lucky enough to have coworkers that worked humbly with me through the learning process and it allowed me to learn at a quick pace. I found a great quote from C.S. Lewis, he stated, “Humility is not thinking less of yourself, it’s thinking of yourself less”. You cannot focus on the growth of a team or an organization if you are self-absorbed.

    [WC – 197]

    Sources:
    Kerpen, D. (2014). 15 Quotes That Remind Us of The Awesome Power of Humility. Retrieved September 21, 2016, from http://www.inc.com/dave-kerpen/15-quotes-that-remind-us-of-the-awesome-power-of-humility.html

    • Levi,
      Great comment! You stated that a leader with humility is someone you would love to work with and I completely agree with you! Being able to have a humble leader will allow you to have and experience an awesome work life. Humility inspires loyalty, helps to build and sustain cohesive, productive teamwork, and decreases staff turnover (Humility is key, 2016).

      Humility Is Key to Effective Leadership & High Performance. (n.d.). Retrieved September 25, 2016, from http://www.executiveforums.com/resource.php?rID=1100

      [WC-77]

  35. This article is really well written Dr. Green. Humility is often overlooked which made this article very enjoyable to read. It has a lot of great facts and life lessons that you could use in everyday life. My favorite part is the example of Muhammad Ali. He believed that humble people don’t get very far. He was great at what he did but because of his attitude he wasn’t being a great leader while doing it. Another thing I enjoyed about the article is the list of ways leaders can cultivate a humble spirit. Those five ways are extremely great examples of what a true leader should be like. Humility becomes a huge part of being an effective leader, however it shouldn’t just be the leader’s goal but the whole organization as a whole. “Some narcissistic business leaders are treated like rock stars. But leaders who are humble and admit mistakes outshine them all” (Moran, 2014). Being able to stay humble while trying to get your job down by leading the people who are a part of your organization is the best kind of leadership.

    “Being humble means recognizing that we are not on this earth to see how important we can become, but to see how much difference we can make in the lives of others” –Gordon B. Hinckley

    Moran, G. (2014). 6 Ways Humility Can Make You A Better Leader. Retrieved September 21, 2016, from https://www.fastcompany.com/3034144/hit-the-ground-running/6-ways-humility-can-make-you-a-better-leader

    [WC – 238]

  36. Humility is a trait of character that makes people great and sometimes wise. Humility is something really hard to find in business, because humility is putting its own interest down for the good of other people. “Some persons are always ready to level those above them down to themselves, while they are never willing to level those below them up to their own position.” In business people want to make profit so their care about them and not about the good of people they are working with. It is in leadership where being humble is hard because a leader wants the success but they do not want to take the blame. In the article Edward said: “A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit.” Being humble is something that people learn from their failures instead of their victories. A good leadership cares about his employees and makes the victory their.

    Green, /Daryl. “Nu Leadership Revolution Blog.” Nu Leadership Revolution Blog. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Sept. 2016.

    • Suzanne, I like the quote where you said “Being humble is something that people learn from their failures instead of their victories.” I totally agree with this quote because I think that a lot times when you are being successful you can get cocky and can become really selfish. It sometimes takes failure for you to really appreciate others and to become humble. The definition of being humble can be defined as ‘a modest or low view of one’s own importance.’ When you are in a company setting this is so important because it takes everyone working there to make the company great and not just one person alone. If a company lacks the humbleness in the leadership role it will quickly start to reflect in the company and can become a problem for everyone working there.

      [WC-130]
      Green, /Daryl. “Nu Leadership Revolution Blog.” Nu Leadership Revolution Blog. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Sept. 2016.

  37. Dr. Green,
    Your article holds immense truth. We are fortunate as OBU students to learn from professors who recognize the importance of spiritual disciplines such as humility. Humility is usually either non-existent or overlooked in positions of leadership within a company. Society tells individuals to profess personal glory and success while as Christ-followers, throughout God’s word, we are called to be humble. A humble leader is an empowering leader. I agree with your statement, “even the most brilliant individual must apply some humility in being successful because they must submit to the good of the organization instead of their own selfish ambitions” (Green, 2016). In positions of leadership, often times, the best leader may not possess the ability to perform every skill most effectively, but rather, gives others the opportunity to use their skills in order to better the good of the organization as a whole. By setting aside pride, a good leader empowers others to use their talents to the best of their abilities.

    [WC- 167]

    Sources
    Green, D. D. (2016, September 11). Humility in Leadership: the MIT Principle. Retrieved from Nu Leadership Revolution

  38. Humility and servant leadership in the business world are important qualities to have at any level, but most importantly in a leadership position. To succeed in any aspect of leadership there needs to be humility. Being a humble leader means leading in a selfless way. “To promote inclusion and reap its rewards, leaders should embrace a selfless leadership style”(Prime, Salib 2014). Leading with humility can also mean seeing different views of how things can be done. Every person has an opinion of the best way to do something and as a humble leader you should be willing to see these opinions. Another way to show humble leadership is realizing your mistakes and learning from them. As a leader you can’t blame the people under you when something goes wrong you should understand that you are the leader and need to take responsibility for what has happened.

    Prime, J., & Salib, E. (2014, May 12). The Best Leaders Are Humble Leaders. Retrieved September 22, 2016, from https://hbr.org/2014/05/the-best-leaders-are-humble-leaders

    [WC-166]

    • Kailey, I liked the quote you included that stated,“To promote inclusion and reap its rewards, leaders should embrace a selfless leadership style”. I also agree with your point that humble leadership allows for more input and openness to other ideas. This can be hugely beneficial to any company. A humble leader is one that all people respect and this can be widely beneficial to any organization. When a manager is respected on a level of virtue rather than off of experience or power alone, the people under under their leadership are more likely to feel encouraged. This encouragement breeds a positive work environment and builds a trust in the leader that goes deeper than trust in a power-hungry and selfish kind of leader. There’s a reason why Jesus talks so much about humility and why it marks a good leader amidst a world of prideful agendas. Mark 10:42-45 challenges us to humble ourselves to the point of a slave. Jesus himself, as our greatest example, who came not to be served, but to serve.

      [WC – 174]

  39. Humility is a word that characterizes a trustworthy human being. It can be a descriptive term that can only be described as humble. Just this past two years I have met one person in particular that I find to be the most humble person I know. My doubles partner Kat. She has shown me what it is to be the type of person people love. She is a hard worker and always tries her best in anything that she does. This is the type of person that I would follow into any business. “Do you wish to rise? Begin by descending. You plan a tower that will pierce the clouds? Lay first the foundation of humility.” Saint Augustine

    Saint Augustine http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/s/saintaugus148548.html?src=t_humility

    WC [116]

    • Hi Alex
      You stated: “She is a hard worker and always tries her best in anything that she does” what you are describing is commitment and not humility, professor Green gives a statement “in order to achieve overall success for the organization or team, individuals at some point will have to sacrifice their own personal goals for the organization.” In sport the goal is to win, sacrifice her own personal goals is not something she will do because it is not on the purpose of what she is supposed to do. Being humble is the fact that your friend is better than you, and will not show it off.

      Green, D. D. (2016). Humility in Leadership: The MIT Principle. Retrieved on September 24, 2016, from Nu Leadership Revolution Bloghttps://nuleadership.com/2016/09/11/humility-in-leadership-the-mit-principle/.

      [WC-130]

  40. Green (2016) “man has a dependency on God that shows humans their insufficiency of their own wisdom and power” I think this is the most important aspect of humility or humbleness. As a Christian our first commandment is to love. It is the essence of Christ and showing humility honors Christ. As a believer if you are following in his steps then you can expect for good to follow you though the road is trying. It helps you have better relationships, is a great attribute for leaders, and exemplifies good self-control which is vital in all aspects of life. Humility may be the difference in a promotion in an organization that has overlooked your attributes and expertise in the past due to a boisterous attitude. Williams (2015) there are is a list of “top 10 mistakes managers make [and the] first insensitive to others: abrasive, intimidating, bullying style.” Understanding from a management point of view that aggression and abuse are one of the many issues that employees equivocate to being a poor boss it would suit all to tailor their attitude.

    [WC-181]
    Williams, Chuck. (2015). Principles of Management.
    Green, D. D. (2016, September 11). Humility in Leadership: the MIT Principle. Retrieved from Nu Leadership Revolution Blog: https://nuleadership.com/2016/09/11/humility-in-leadership-the-mit-principle/

  41. Sarah,

    I loved the way you incorporated Scripture into your response; Jesus was the ultimate example of servanthood. I also completely know what you mean about managers. When I waitressed, I had three managers, and none of them had the quality of humility. They constantly talked down towards the wait staff and always lost their temper. I also enjoyed the quote you used from Buster. If you lose the quality of humility, you are opening he door to failure. There is always room for improvement.

    WC-[104]

  42. Dr. Green,
    I thought it was very interesting that MIT has that type of message set upon their students and think it is a great example that should be set out for other universities. You stated that “If you are a sport fan, you have probably seen star athletes that ‘show boat’ and bring attention to themselves that they are great”, which made me think of when I was on my high school dance team. There were certain occasions where my coach would have to remind us that individually we were good, but as a team we were even better. If we did not learn to leave our ego out the door we would not be a successful team and I think that really helped us as a team. From a business perspective, humility needs to be present in a workforce because if there is no humility people will start losing respect for one another. When this happens communication is weakened, which can cause a lot of problems for a company.

    [WC-153]

    Green, D. D. (2016, September 11). Humility in Leadership: the MIT Principle. Retrieved from Nu Leadership Revolution

    • Ashley,
      I am on the cheer team at Oklahoma Baptist University and our coach reinforces the same values that your coach focused on. Just like you stated, our coach reminds us to “leave our ego out the door” every day. This is because she is a firm believer that if there is one member that feels they are above the team then the team will suffer greatly and not reach our full potential. The saying that “one bad apple can spoil the bunch” (Finnigan 2013) could not be more true in a team situation, but in a business setting it rings even truer. If a group of coworkers are working towards the same goal, but there is one person in that group that feels they are better than the group and does not want to pull their weight or does something outside of their job due to lack of trust in coworkers, then that can be detrimental to the overall goal. This idea of putting oneself before the team will never fail to ruin bigger and better business ventures for the group.

      Finnigan, D. (2013, November 07). Dealing With An Underperformer Is Essential For Your Startup’s Success. Retrieved September 23, 2016, from http://thenextweb.com/entrepreneur/2013/11/07/dealing-underperforming-employees-essential-startups-success/#gref

      [WC-200]

    • Hi Ashley

      You stated, from a business perspective, humility needs to be present in a workforce because if there is no humility people will start losing respect for one another. When this happens communication is weakened, which can cause a lot of problems for a company. I agree with your opinion. It is really important to have casual atmosphere at work and with your coworkers. According to Harvard Business Review (2009), Humility can be practiced by everyone in the workplace. Its presence makes for a more harmonious and collaborative work environment because people feel they can share their ideas without fear of being “one-upped” or put down.

      Baldoni, J. (n.d.). Leadership Development: Use Humility to Improve performance. Retrieved September 25, 2016, from https://hbr.org/2009/11/use-humility-to-improve-perfor
      [WC-125]

    • Hi Ashley,

      You stated, ”From a business perspective, humility needs to be present in a workforce because if there is no humility people will start losing respect for one another.” I completely agree, and your statement is also in agreement with what Magnus Frostenson wrote in the Journal of Business Ethics, “The virtue of humility is often considered to be at odds with common business practice. In recent years, however, scholars within business ethics and leadership have shown an increasing interest in humility . . . arguing that humility reflects the interdependent nature of business” (2016) What this article was saying is that no matter how smart or business savvy someone is, the nature of business itself means that we have to rely on other people to be successful. If all the leader of business does is undermine their employees’ skills and only cares about building up his own reputation, the business will not flourish. The employees are going to lose respect for their boss, and lose the motivation to work productively and efficiently.

      (WC-190)

      References

      Frostenson, M. (2016). Humility in Business: A Contextual Approach. Journal Of Business Ethics, 138(1), 91-102.

  43. Hi Dr. Green,
    It is an interesting topic!! I do believe people who do not have humility are unable to learn. Not only as a leadership, but also as little kids when they learn from elderly people. Leaders need to have humility in order to learn and accept opinion from others. No one person has all the answers. People want to work for leaders who value their opinions rather than ignore or dismiss them. Humility is one of the critical leadership factors for creating an environment where employees from different demographic backgrounds.
    Smith said “Humble leaders foster learning-oriented teams and engage employees. They also optimize job satisfaction and employee retention” (para. 3). Humility is an important component of effective leadership in modern organizations.

    [WC-123]

    Reference:
    Green, D. (2016). Humility in Leadership: The MIT Principle. Retrieved on September 21, 2016, from Nu Leadership Revolution Blog https://nuleadership.com/2016/09/11/humility-in-leadership-the-mit-principle/. Para. 3.
    Smith, M. Humility Is Key to Effective Leadership & High Performance. Retrieved on September 21, 2016, from http://www.executiveforums.com/resource.php?rID=1100&rType=A&osCsid=qad5hr72pjnr5mk5bf81jr0bm1

    • Hi Nalinee Junkaew,
      I very like your opinion that leaders need to have humility in order to learn and accept an opinion from others. In addition, it helps the smooth running of the process, inspire everyone. When receiving members expressed self-aware behavior, opinion, openness to feedback and ideas, appreciation of others, that is leadership helped inspire them. According to Michelle, “Leaders who embrace growth signal to followers that learning, growing, mistakes, uncertainty, and false starts are normal and expected in the workplace, and this produces followers and entire organizations that continually develop and improve” (Michelle M. Smith, 2016).

      On the other hand, I think humility may not be true. Sometimes, We can easily see many many people very success but they have not humility. Take the case in point, Jose Mourinho who was coach of many great football clubs such as Real Marid, Inter Milan, Chelsea, or Manchester United. Humility never existed in his life. He does not listen, but he knows to learn. He always thinks he is number one (he said he is special) and he usually numbers one. The main thing that made his fame.

      Therefore, I do not know what is wrong and what is right. Maybe, the important thing is the balance between pride and humility.

      All of this things is my opinion, I very happy if you can read and share with me.

      Smith, M. M. (n.d.). Humility Is Key to Effective Leadership & High Performance. Retrieved September 21, 2016, from http://www.executiveforums.com/resource.php?rID=1100

      • Hi Long,
        Thank you for your respond. I like your example of Jose Mourinho. I have seen some of these talented or succeeded people have high self-confidence. They tend to deal immediately and directly with problems and conflicts by themselves because they believe they can make the best and right decision.
        However, some people question if it is possible to be a strong leader, yet remain humble? I contend that strong leadership, in fact, requires humility. In practice, humility in leadership is about listening well, admitting when you are wrong, and highlighting others’ strengths and accomplishments above your own. These are the core elements of being a humility leader. Refers to Philippians quote “Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit, but in humility consider others better than yourselves. Each of you should look not only to your own interest, but also to the interests of others” (Worthington, 2007, p. 6).

        Reference:
        Worthington, E. (2007). Humility: The Quiet Virtue. (1st Ed.). Templeton Press. P. 6.
        [WC-167]

  44. Dr. Green,
    I agree with a lot of the points you made about incorporating humility into life, work, school, etc. I never thought of humility being a benefactor in success. However, after reading this blog, it made me think of when humility might have brought about success for me. In this case, I thought about track because we work as a unit, as if it is our job. We have to work together to try and find ways to be successful. We have the arrogant ones who think that without them our team would be nothing, or the too humble ones that secretly know without them we would be nothing. Then, I think about my coach and how he teaches and coaches us. A lot of times he makes me and I assume most of the team feel somewhat “dumb” so to speak, when giving his speeches. From reading this blog post, I have discovered that he says the things that humiliate us, to better us. This being, that we do not like being wrong or humiliated, but once we are we will work much harder to achieve what needs to be achieved, to perform our jobs to the best of our abilities.

    WC:203

  45. This article shines light not only on an academic problem, but also on a cultural problem. I find it intriguing that MIT, one of the nation’s most competitive academic institutions, consciously encourages both students and professors to check their ego at the door. “American culture does not prepare us for this approach to leadership, nor does academia.”(Guthrie) While I encourage leaders and students to seek humility in all areas of work, I would caution them as to what extent they become humble. People who are overly humble can easily be taken advantage of. But this should not discourage from a person’s path to humbleness. Like anything else, but especially in leadership, there must be a balance, “Strong leaders wear their humility lightly, and they rarely showcase either their genius or their humility.”(Guthrie)

    Guthrie, D. (2013) The Paradox Of Humility In American Business And Society. Received September 21, 2016, from http://www.forbes.com/sites/dougguthrie/2013/11/15/the-paradox-of-humility-in-american-business-and-society/#21d88cdd2d44

    (WC-151)

    • Brady,
      I like that you pointed out “people who are overly humble can easily be taken advantage of.” It’s good to try and see the best in people, but a person has to have the common sense to be able to realize when they are being taken advantage of/used. While working this summer, I saw first hand how people could look at a new employee and think they can push a bunch of their own work off on a person when they don’t want to do the work themselves. Humility is a virtue to aim to possess, but it should be strived for smartly. A person must also realize that people don’t all see humility in the same light, so people can think they’re being humble when they (in your eyes) aren’t. Frostenson (2016) stated that “differing worldviews generate conflicting conceptualizations of what humility is and when, how and why it should be exercised” (p. 92). This is an important thing to remember when a person enters the work force.

      Frostenson, M. (2016). Humility in Business: A Contextual Approach. Journal Of Business Ethics, 138(1),
      91-102. doi:10.1007/s10551-015-2601-9

      [WC-187]

  46. Humility is one of the toughest human qualities to have. We all want to be proud of our accomplishments and say that we can put our name on that something and call it ours, but rarely do people think about the negative aspects that pride brings. Having humility creates a foundation in which you can accept success while maintaining your failures. In the Christian community this is almost a given, but in the real world there is greed, pride, and many other selfish acts that go in in business. In Proverbs 11:2 it says, “When pride comes, then comes disgrace, but with humility comes wisdom (Proverbs 2009). And coming from a Christian stand point this is exactly the truth and how I have lived my whole life by not being prideful, but how do we show humility to those who are used to prideful acts? I think that is the real question.
    WC- 165
    Proverbs 11:2. (2009). In Holman Christian Standard Bible. Nashville, TN:
    Holman Bible.

  47. Hi Dr Green
    Thank you very much for this very insightful post, the concept of humility in leadership is often neglected, forgetting that leadership is stewardship. We see this concept of humility displayed by the greatest of all leaders; Jesus Christ in his time on earth and as Christians we have a responsibility to imbibe this same traits.
    According to research from the University Of Washington Foster School Of Business Co-author Michael Johnson notes “Humble people are more likely to be high performers in individual and team settings, and they tend to make the most effective leaders” Growing and learning often involves failure and can be embarrassing, leaders who can overcome their fears and broadcast their feelings as they work through the messy internal growth process will be viewed more favorably by their followers. They also legitimize their employee’s own professional development journeys and will have higher performing organizations.
    However as leaders we have to be mindful that humility displayed is not misinterpreted as a lack of competence or weakness on the part of a leader, considering the cultural differences apparent in the society, often times a leader who constantly seeks feedback and suggestions from his followers can be viewed as incompetent.
    [WC – 200]
    Sources
    1. Green, D. D. (2016, September 11). Humility in Leadership: the MIT Principle. Retrieved from Nu Leadership Revolution Blog: https://nuleadership.com/2016/09/11/humility-in-leadership-the-mit-principle/
    2. Renaissance executive forums : http://www.executiveforums.com/resource.php?rID=1100&rType=A&osCsid=qad5hr72pjnr5mk5bf81jr0bm1

  48. Humility is defined, according to Google, as “a modest or low view of one’s own importance”. This character trait in a leader is really hard to find, and I think it’s because leaders are looked to for direction and strength. How is one to practice humility while also exhibiting strength and control? Mark 10: 42-45 displays the concept of becoming first by putting yourself last when it says, “…whoever would be first among you must be slave to all…” (Mark 10:42-45 English Standard Version). When I think of a good leader in accordance to the Biblical definition of a good leader, I think that he or she is marked with humility in such a way that garners true and genuine respect. A leader who shows humility is one worth trusting. In my own work experience, I had the opportunity to work for a man who went to my church. Although not perfect, I knew that I could always come to him when needed and he would respond in service and understanding. This was a lot of the reason why I chose to work there for four years.

    [WC – 196]

  49. Dr. Green
    You stated, Leaders can start by applying some humility in the manner that they relate to their employees, managers, and other stakeholders. It is interesting to see that humility and leadership can be associated. In fact being a leader gives people some power and responsibilities when being humble requires forgetting his own interest for the good of a group. Leaders have generally people under their commands, it gives them authority some people can take advantage of this; however a good leader will apply humility in his relationship with his employees or co workers to make the communication and the work better. Humility reminds people that no one is better than another, having the authority does not mean being always right or being the best.

    Green, D. D. (2016). Humility in Leadership: The MIT Principle. Retrieved on September 21, 2016, from Nu Leadership Revolution Bloghttps://nuleadership.com/2016/09/11/humility-in-leadership-the-mit-principle/.

    [WC-147]

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