Helping Today’s Universities Survive Market Changes and Provide Students with Better Experiences

Researchers, Dr. Daryl Green and Dr. George Taylor, share their insight at the 2019 Institute of Global Business Research Conference. 

How do today’s universities and colleges survive with rising educational cost, declining employments, and growing dissatisfaction among the US citizens?  Dr. Daryl D. Green and Dr. George Taylor III shared their solutions at the 2020 Institute for Global Business Research Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada. The Institute for Global Business Research (IGBR) is a non-profit organization, originated from many years of professional, academic teaching and research expertise of accomplished business professors from around the globe.

Due to numerous problems in higher education, universities are struggling for sustainable answers. Higher education is undergoing tremendous changes. Universities and colleges are being bombarded with disruptive change which has become fatal.  Enrollment in accredited colleges and universities have shrunk consistently since 2010 since the rising of online learning. According to Moody (2015), closure rate – out of 2,300 institutions – would triple by 2017, and the merger rate would double.  Dr. Clayton Christensen, renowned Harvard University professor, proclaimed “In 15 years from now half of US universities may be in bankruptcy.” Without making the necessary corrections, most academic institutions will not be able to survive. Dr. Green, conference presenter explains, “Small liberal arts colleges are the most susceptible to market forces.  Disruptive change has a dangerous consequence to traditional institutions. The results of disruptive change for organizations produces unpredictability and uncertainty of outcomes in the environments.” Dr. Green, Dr. Taylor, and Mrs. Violet Ford (John Hopkins University doctoral student) are developing a theoretical article, “Cultivating the Entrepreneurial Mindset in Today’s Small Liberal colleges & Universities” to discuss their initial findings with other scholars. Dr. Green and Dr. Taylor presented at the IGBR Conference.  Dr. Green is the Dickinson Chair and an Associate professor in the College of Business at Oklahoma Baptist University. He is a former US Department of Energy program manager with over 25 years of professional management experience. He is a nationally syndicated columnist, where he writes in the areas of leadership, decision-making, and culture. Dr. Green has a doctoral degree in Strategic Leadership from Regent University.

Dr. Taylor notes, “Traditional liberal arts colleges possess formal structure with identified roles and responsibilities.  Yet, the structure of many universities vary depending on their history, mission, and institutional type….Overall, there is a reliance on bureaucratic organizational structures; academic institutions, whether public or private,  incorporate key authority structures, including a governing board, a president or chancellor, a cohort of administrative leaders, and an academic senate.”  Dr. Taylor is an Assistant Professor in the School of Business at Tulsa Community College.  Previously, he served as a naval officer specializing in HR, and has over 25 years of leadership and management experience. His writings are in the areas of knowledge management, workplace spirituality, and employee engagement. Dr. Taylor has a doctoral degree in Organizational Leadership from the University of Phoenix and is 2019 EdD cohort learner attending Oklahoma University.  

In analyzing the current crises in higher education, their presentation describes a set of strategic implications that will aid universities planning to create sustainability education programs. In preparing today’s liberal arts university, administrators and senior executives of these institutions need to infuse an entrepreneurial mind-set in their faculty.  Here are their suggestions: (a)Leaders need to model the way in entrepreneurial mindset; (b)Be adaptable to changing market conditions; and (c) Universities must create entrepreneurial climates.  Dr. Green adds, “Cultivating an entrepreneurial mindset will infuse innovative thinking toward difficult problems and provide new revenue streams to universities that utilize student tuition as the principle income for these academic institutions.

To learn more about this research or to schedule media interviews with these researchers, please contact Dr. Green at drdarylgreen@gmail.com or 865-719-7239.

About AGSM LLC

AG Strategic Management Consulting (AGSM) is a start-up consulting firm focused on serving emerging and existing businesses in the areas of strategic planning, marketing, project management, and other administrative services. With a core staff of seasoned and nationally renowned professionals and a team approach to consulting projects, AGSM will offer exemplary services that meet the needs of its clients.

AGSM Consulting is also an intellectual property-based strategic consultancy which research and develops products includes books, e-books, articles, whitepapers, videos, podcasts, and other content medium to create new knowledge, training, and professional advisement

Dr. Daryl D. Green is an internationally acknowledged author and researcher.  He is the Vice President of AGSM LLC. He is also the Dickinson Chair at the Oklahoma Baptist University. Dr. Green writes a syndicated online column and blog. Moreover, he has been quoted in major media outlets, including USA Today, Associated Press, Ebony, and BET. In 2016, he retired from the federal government as a senior program manager. Dr. Green has spent more than 20 years helping organizations and thousands of individuals make good decisions through his lectures, seminars, and columns. 

Research encourages universities to nourish entrepreneurial spirit in Generation Z

Speaking to a packed crowd at the 2019 ACBSP Conference, Dr. Daryl D. Green from the Oklahoma Baptist University, revealed that recent research shows Generation Z students are not only the most diverse and inclusive yet, but also the most ambitious. Making up nearly a quarter of the American population (some 74 million young adults), they shun the traditional employee route of their predecessors, with 72% of them wanting to start a business with 61% preferring to be an entrepreneur rather than an employee.

This high percentage reflects the differing work ethic of these students. Having never known a world without social media or smartphones, 84% of participants in a recent study by Forrester showed they regularly multitask with an internet-connected device when watching TV, whilst 66% believe technology makes anything possible. Not just digitally savvy, these students are driven to set themselves apart with nearly 50% participating in internships during high school for the purpose of advancing themselves professionally and 26% currently volunteering in their spare time. 

Therefore if Universities want to continue to attract the best students, it is important for them to adapt their teaching practices for Generation Z. Dr. Green broke this down into seven suggested practices;

  • Creating an academic environment that fosters creativity and entrepreneurial thinking
  • Setting clear expectations and boundaries
  • Engaging students digitally in the classroom and beyond
  • Breaking work assignments into smaller, manageable segments
  • Communicating regularly to provide frequent feedback
  • Being relevant and providing practical application and business role models
  • Incorporating a fluidic frequent reward system

Summing up, Dr. Green said “For the first time in history, there are now 5 generations coexisting in the work place and Generation Z, with its diversity and ingenuity, may be the best of all. This is why it is so important for universities and places of higher learning to encourage the natural entrepreneurial spirit of the most tech savvy, pragmatic and diverse generation yet; enabling them to join the workforce ready to hit the ground running and perhaps inspire businesses to adapt to the future.”  

Event Photos:

unnamed-6Caption #1:  Dr. Green presents “Wire for Life: Inspiring Generation Z to Be Entrepreneurial Leaders.”

unnamed-5Caption #2:  Dr. Green engages the audience of academics.

unnamed-4Caption #3:  Dr. Green unlocks the mystery related to GEN Z.

unnamed-3Caption #4:  Dr. Green discusses 5 generations in the workplaces.

unnamed-2Caption #5:  The audience listens as Dr. Green breaks down GEN Z traits.

unnamed-1Caption #6:  Dr. Green reunites with a former classmate from his doctoral program.

unnamedAbout Oklahoma Baptist University/Dr. Daryl D. Green: 

With its campus in Shawnee, and locations in Oklahoma City and Broken Arrow, OBU offers 10 bachelor’s degrees with 88 fields of study and 5 master’s degree programs. The Christian liberal arts university has an overall enrollment of 2,073, with students from 40 states and 35 other countries. OBU has been rated as one of the top 10 regional colleges in the West by the U.S. News and World Report for 25 consecutive years and has been Oklahoma’s highest rated regional college in the U.S. News rankings for 23 consecutive years. OBU is one of the three universities in Oklahoma and the only private Oklahoma University listed on Great Value College’s rankings of 50 Great Affordable Colleges in the Midwest. Forbes.com consistently ranks OBU as a top university in Oklahoma, and the Princeton Review has named OBU one of the best colleges and universities in the western United States for 12 consecutive years.

Dr. Daryl Green, assistant professor of business at Oklahoma Baptist University and Dickinson chair of business.  He is an award-winning author with more than 30 books. He and his wife Estraletta have several years of social and competitive ballroom dance experience, competing in Georgia, Louisiana, and Oklahoma. Dr. Green has taught social dancing classes and is a former president of the Knoxville Chapter of USA Dance Inc.