Buyers’ Trust

ethics-cross the finger

Too many businesses lose their focus. They are often consumed with their own quest for profitability at any cost.  Consequently, buyers become less trusting of these companies. 

In fact, countless businesses are making careless mistakes. Former Johnson & Johnson Chairman and CEO Jim Burke explains, “You can’t have success without trust…You tell me any human relationship that works without trust, whether it’s a marriage or a friendship or a social interaction, in the long run, the same thing is the trust about business, especially businesses that deal with the public.” 

Most businesses underestimate the critical attribute of trust in profitability. Any value proposition will fail without TRUST.  Some organizations seek to clearly deceive customers in the short run to gain profitability. It’s a fatal mistake. 

Mark Johnston and Greg Marshall, authors of Relationship Selling, maintain that building trust is essential in fostering good relationships with customers.  In fact, one of the primary tasks of organizational leaders is to foster trust within and outside of the organization.  

Many businesses suffer because they don’t understand their customers and how to meet their needs. Therefore, the message is mixed!  In fact, the manner in which customers are treated have a bearing on their customer satisfaction.

Paul Peter and James Donnelly, authors of Marketing Management, note that building a good relationship with channel members is a critical part of marketing communications. Understanding customers is critical. Therefore, businesses need to provide them the right message is vital.

Furthermore, numerous managers believe they can offer this concept without regard to their employees. Some treat employees poorly and expect them to showcase service with a smile. In this situation, trust is lost. Managers need to model the way in value creation. 

John Hamm, author of Unusually Excellent: The Necessary Nine Skills Required for the Practice of Great Leadership argues that some managers have misunderstood leadership. They feel they can work fewer hours, give their work to others, and not respect employees due to their position or title. 

Yet, managers’ bad behaviors are not without consequences. Employees soon lose their trust in these managers to do the right things. Hamm explains, “When leaders compromise their own integrity, it takes that extra urge out of our bodies that says we’re willing to go the mile.  Therefore, trust as a competitive advantage cannot be underestimated by today’s businesses. 

Please discuss your professional experience with customers and their trust in buying.

 © 2013 by Daryl D. Green